Mountains

Military Honor Men from Montana, World War I

The officers of the American Expeditionary Forces who entered the service from the state of Montana, and who were killed in action were as follows:

Orville L. Anderson, captain Company C, 128th Infantry, killed August 1, 1918;
Lee S. Cassell, first lieutenant One Hundred and Thirtieth Field Ambulance, Medical Corps, killed November 14, 1918;

Harold H. Joyce, First Lieutenant Company I, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Infantry, killed August 30, 1918; Raymond J. Saunders, first lieutenant Ninety-fourth Aero Squadron, killed October 23, 1918;
George Ahlquist, second lieutenant Three Hundred and Twenty-seventh Infantry, killed October 20, 1918; James C. Simpkins, second lieutenant Two Hundred and Fifty-fifth Aero Squadron, killed September 18, 1918; and Randolph C. Stocker, second lieutenant Company D, Thirty-ninth Infantry, killed September 28, 1918.

Emmet E. Carruthers, first lieutenant of Company A, Three Hundred and Sixteenth Engineers, died of wounds, November 2, 1918.

The following officers died of disease or other causes:

Winfield S. Faulds, first lieutenant Thirty-fifth Sanitary Squad, died October 10, 1918.

Cyrus J. Gatton, first lieutenant First Aero Squadron, died November 4, 1918.

Clinton V. Reed, first lieutenant Medical Corps, Base Hospital No. 40, died October 7, 1918.

Charles L. Watkins, first lieutenant Headquarters Detachment, Signal Reserve Corps, died June 23, 1918.

George S. Reisz, second lieutenant, Headquarters Detail, Aviation Instructor, died September 19, 1918.

Montana's soldiers who won the Distinguished Service Cross were fifty-three in number. The award of the Distinguished Service Cross is confined to anyone who may distinguish himself or herself by extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United States under circumstances which do not justify the award of the Medal of Honor, and may be awarded to any person who while serving in any capacity with the army distinguishes himself or herself. Following is given the names of the heroes who received these awards and details of the deeds for which they were thus honored.

Arthur Aamot, sergeant, Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Juvigny, France, August 29, 1918. Sergeant Aamot had sought cover in a shell hole, after a difficult advance in the face of heavy machine-gun fire, when he observed distress signals from a tank nearby on which concentrated artillery and machine-gun fire was being directed by the enemy. Leaving his shelter, Sergeant Aamot proceeded through the fire to the tank where he found a wounded man, whom he courageously carried to safety. Residence at enlistment: Saco, Montana.

John Ora Adams, second lieutenant, Ninth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Medeah Farm, France, October 3, 1918. He remained on duty after receiving two shrapnel wounds in the arm, and continued to lead his platoon to its objective. He directed the consolidation of his position and the reorganization of his platoon before finally reporting to the aid station, eight hours after being wounded. Residence at appointment: Kalispell, Montana.

Ernest H. Anderson, private first class, Company F, First Gas Regiment. For extraordinary heroism in action near Moulin de Guenoville, France, September 26, 1918. Private Anderson, with three other soldiers, advanced nearly 200 yards over an open hillside exposed to machine-gun fire and carried two wounded men to the protection of a nearby trench. Private Anderson was later killed in action. Emergency address: Mrs. Christine Anderson, mother, 706 Chestnut Street, Anaconda, Montana. Residence at enlistment: 706 Chestnut Street. Anaconda.

Oliver Anderson, sergeant, Company L, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Steenbrugge, Belgium, October 31, 1918. Sergeant Anderson, with two other soldiers, attacked a strong machine-gun position from which destructive fire had been poured into his platoon and the platoon of the flank company, wounding his lieutenant, the platoon sergeant and many others. They drove the machine-gunners from the position, thereby enabling the line to continue the advance. Residence at enlistment: Sand Creek, Montana.

Harold B. Anthony (army serial No. 2260112), supply sergeant, Company D, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Bois de Very, France, September 26, 1918. Sergeant Anthony, while leading a small detachment operating on the flank of his company, suddenly came under heavy machine-gun fire. Alone he crawled up close to the machine-gun, killed the gunner and captured four prisoners. Again, at Eclisfontaine, France, September 29, 1918, the company was held up by machine-gun fire from front and flank. Sergeant Anthony spotted the machine-gun nest. While attempting to reach an automatic squad to point out the hostile gun he was killed by the machine-gun fire. Emergency address: Alex H. Anthony, father, 1 122 Sharp Avenue, East, Nashville, Tennessee. Residence at enlistment: Y. M. C. A., Miles City, Montana.

Ivan Y. Bailey, private, Intelligence Section, First Battalion, Three Hundred and Sixty-first Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 10, 1918. While on a liaison patrol Private Bailey and Corp. Carl G. Theobald attacked and captured a hostile machine-gun nest and its entire crew. Private Bailey then took the prisoners across "No Man's Land" to the American lines under machinegun fire. Residence at enlistment: Fort Shaw, Montana.

William Belzer, second lieutenant, Air Service, observer, Observation Group, attached to Fourth Army Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Jaulny, France, September 12-13, 1918. On September 12, Lieutenant Belzer, observer, and First Lieut. Wallace Coleman, pilot, while on an artillery surveillance mission, were attacked by an enemy plane. They waited until the enemy was at close range and then fired fifty rounds directly into the vital parts of the enemy machine, which was seen to disappear out of control. The next day, Lieutenants Belzer and Coleman, while on a reconnaissance mission, were attacked by seven enemy aircraft. They unhesitatingly opened fire, but owing to their guns being jammed were forced to withdraw to the American lines, where, clearing the jam, they returned to finish the mission. Their guns again jammed and they were driven back by a large patrol of enemy planes. After skillful maneuvering, they succeeded in putting one gun into use and returning a third time, only to be driven back. Undaunted, they returned the fourth time and accomplished their mission, transmitting valuable information to the Infantry headquarters. Residence at appointment: Glasgow, Montana.

Henry N. Benoit (Army serial No. 2293659), private, first class, Company D, Three Hundred and Sixty-first Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 26 to October 4, 1918. During eight days while acting in the capacity of runner between his company and battalion headquarters, Private Benoit was constantly subjected to heavy shell fire, but performed his mission without thought of personal danger, carrying the many messages promptly and successfully. Residence at enlistment: Ekalaka, Montana.

Arthur I. Clark (Army serial No. 2258790), sergeant, Company C, Thirty-ninth Infantry, Fourth Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Esnes, France, September 26, 1918. Sergeant Clark was in command of one platoon of his company, which was being held up by intense enemy machine-gun fire. Accompanied by two other soldiers, he voluntarily made an attack on one of the nests under heavy fire, firing a rifle grenade into it and forcing its surrender. He then advanced on another machine-gun nest and captured it, taking seven prisoners from both nests. His platoon having been forced to fall back by machinegun fire from the rear, he reorganized it and led it in a successful attack on seventy-five of the enemy whom he discovered nearby. Residence at enlistment: Helena, Montana.

Oscar Clauson, private, Company F, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the Scheldt River, Belgium, October 31, 1918. When the advance of the front line was held up by the fire from a machine-gun nest 300 yards to the front, Private Clauson, with two others, crossed the open field in the face of fire from enemy artillery, machine guns and snipers. Charging the nest they killed two of the crew, wounded two others and captured five, together with the machine-gun. Residence at enlistment: Havre, Montana.

Milan Debney (Army serial 2293685), private, Company B, Three Hundred and Forty-eighth Machine Gun Battalion, Ninety-first Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Eclisfontaine and Tronsol Farm, France, September 27 October 1, 1918. Throughout five days of action Private Debney maintained liaison between company and battalion posts of command, repeatedly passing through enemy barrages and constantly subjected to enemy sniping. Residence at enlistment: Care of the Baltimore Hotel, Butte, Montana.

Louis C. Dolce, corporal, Company C, Second Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Exermont, France, October 8, 1 91 8. He volunteered and laid a telephone line to an advanced observation post under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire, working his way the entire distance of nearly 1 kilometer through dense undergrowth and barbed-wire entanglements. Residence at enlistment: 632 Maryland Avenue, Butte, Montana.

Charles H. Evans (Army serial No. 574149), private, Company B, Fourth Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near the Bois de-Brieulles, France, September 27, 1918. When his company was held up by heavy enemy machine-gun fire, Private Evans and two other soldiers advanced in the face of intense fire and captured the enemy machine-gun nest, from which the fire had been coming, killing two of the enemy and' capturing three prisoners with their machine gun. Residence at enlistment: Lewistown, Montana.

Austin Gates (Army serial No. 14556), private, Company M., Sixteenth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charpentry, France, October 3, 19 18. He went forward with three other soldiers, and, though subjected to intense enemy fire, rescued a wounded soldier who had fallen in advance of the American lines. Residence at enlistment: Drummond, Montana.

Leonard E. Guy (Army serial No. 572657), sergeant, Company C, Fifty-eighth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Nantillois, France, September 27, 19 18. Sergeant Guy displayed exceptional courage in attacking single-handed a machine-gun emplacement, capturing the gun and taking as prisoners three machine-gunners. Residence at enlistment: Great Falls, Montana.

Benjamin P. Harwood, second lieutenant, Field Artillery, observer, Twelfth Aero Squadron, Air Service. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chateau Thierry, France, July 5, 191 8. He volunteered, with another plane, to protect a photographic plane. In the course of their mission they were attacked by seven enemy planes of the Fokker type. He accepted the combat and kept the enemy engaged while the photographic plane completed its mission, but his guns jammed and he himself was seriously wounded. After skillfully clearing his guns, with his plane badly damaged he fought off the hostile planes and enabled the photographic plane to return to the American lines with valuable information. Residence at appointment: Billings, Montana.

Rudolph P. Hassler, sergeant, Company K, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism at Gesnes, France, September 29, 1918. Although he was seriously wounded, he remained in command of his platoon until he was relieved next morning, displaying exceptional devotion to duty. Residence at enlistment: Sumatra, Montana.

Harry Hildebrand, sergeant, Company C, Third Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Soissons, France, July 18-24, 1918. He went forward beyond the front line, exposed to fire of snipers, and repaired and put into action an abandoned enemy machinegun. Later, his platoon commander being wounded and the platoon becoming disorganized through direct artillery fire, he took command, gathered reinforcements, and protected a dangerously exposed flank of the infantry. He also voluntarily led his machine guns with the attacking battalion, rendering most efficient service until wounded. Residence at enlistment: Butte, Montana.

Melvin B. Johnson (Army serial No. 84054), corporal, Company M, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 14, 1918. When his battalion was held up after suffering heavy casualties from flanking machinegun fire, he went out alone with an automatic rifle to a position 250 yards in advance of the American lines, and, although subjected to intense fire from three directions, operated his gun and so neutralized the enemy fire while his battalion reformed. Pie was killed on this mission, undertaken on his own initiative. Emergency address: Mrs. Oliva Johnson, mother, Clear Brook, Minnesota. Residence at enlistment: Greve, Montana.

Clifford M. Jordan, private, Company L, Sixteenth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cantigny, France, June 2, 1918. He went forward under intense machine-gun and artillery fire and assisted in the removal of a wounded soldier over a distance of 1 kilometer. Now deceased. Emergency address: J.I. B. Hanson, friend, Malta, Montana. Residence at enlistment: Malta, Montana.

Emanuel Karch, private, Company B, Sixteenth Infantry. Displaying exceptional initiative and bravery throughout the operations south of Soissons, France, July 18-22, 1918; he with extraordinary heroism, July 21, with two companions captured two machine guns that were causing heavy losses to his company. Residence at enlistment: Angela, Montana.

Eugene F. Knoke, private, Company M, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 29, 1918. He performed his duties as company runner with the utmost fearlessness, crossing fire-swept fields on two occasions to carry important messages to neighboring units. Residence at enlistment: Glasston, Montana.

Christian Kurle, private, Company H, Three Hundred and Seventh Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Oches, France, November 4, 1918. Exposing himself to heavy machine-gun fire, Private Kurle crossed an open field 300 yards wide and rescued a severely wounded comrade. Residence at enlistment: Angela, Montana.

Arthur S. Long (Army serial No. 44521), private, Company D, Sixteenth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Hill 272, France, October 9, 19 18. Facing direct fire from a 77-millimeter gun which was enfilading his company, he advanced against the gun with an automatic rifle. Attacking the German gun position, he captured the crew, making it possible for his company to hold the ground it had gained. Residence at enlistment: Box No. 57, Roberts, Montana.

Luzius Luzi, private, Company M, Twenty-third Infantry. For extraordinary heroism. He fearlessly and frequently passed through heavy machine-gun fire while performing his duty as runner near Chateau Thierry, France, June 6, 1918, after being twice wounded. Residence at enlistment: Salesville, Montana.

Daniel McAuliffe, corporal, Company M, Sixteenth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Argonne Forest, France, October 4, 1918. Leading his squad on enemy machine-gun nests which had been inflicting severe casualties on his platoon, Corporal McAuliffe opened an effective bombing attack on the nests, and, although severely wounded, remained in command until the strong point was reduced. Residence at enlistment: 939 Hornet Street, Butte, Montana.

William McLoughlin, private, Company A, Third Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Berzy-le-Sec, France, July 21, 1918. He advanced against a machine gun, and, single-handed, killed or captured the entire crew. Residence at enlistment: Anaconda. Montana.

Duncan A. McRae, sergeant, Company M, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October n, 1918. He took out a patrol for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the enemy and the location of machine guns. Three of his men were killed but he continued on over a difficult terrain and returned with information of the highest value in subsequent operations. Residence at enlistment: 902 Ninth Avenue, Helena, Montana.

Carl J. Maier, private, first class, Company I, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Bois de Cheppy, near Meuse, France, September 26, 191 8. Working with a patrol in an attack on an enemy machine gun, he crawled upon the emplacement and without assistance killed three enemy gunners and captured their machine gun. Residence at enlistment: Glendive, Montana.

Jesse Marlin, corporal, Company B, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Juvigny, France, August 31, 1918. He was one of a party of three officers and two men who, armed with one German machine gun and three German rifles, attacked a machine-gun nest held by seventy Germans. Under terrific fire from the enemy, who laid down an artillery barrage upon their position, they concentrated their rifle fire so effectively that thirty-two Germans surrendered within an hour. After the prisoners had been brought in, Corporal Marlin, with a private, established another machine gun in an advanced position and kept up a concentrated fire on the Germans until he was wounded in the body five times by machine-gun fire. Emergency address: L. C. Hall, friend, General Delivery, Billings, Montana. Residence at enlistment, same.

Robert J. Maxey, lieutenant-colonel, Eighteenth Infantry. On May 28, 1918, at Cantigny, France, he advanced with the first wave and, in the face of heavy shell and machine-gun fire, located the objective of his battalion. He was a cool, dependable and heroic leader. Although fatally wounded, he gave detailed instructions to his second in command and caused himself to be carried to his regimental commander and delivered important information before he died. Emergency address: Mrs. Lu Knowles Maxey, wife, 900 First Street, Missoula, Montana. Residence at appointment: same.

Frank D. Miller (army serial No. 2706), private, Medical Detachment, Twenty-eighth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Exermont, France, October 1-12, 1918. His detachment having been reduced to but three men, Private Miller displayed conspicuous courage and devotion to duty in caring for and evacuating wounded across an area swept by shell and machine-gun fire to the regimental aid station and returning with badly-needed medical supplies to the forward aid station. His conduct was an inspiration to his associates, their commanding officer being absent and the sergeant in charge having been killed. Residence at enlistment: Great Falls, Montana.

James H. Moore, Jr. (army serial No. 3137555), corporal, Company E, Two Hundred and Seventh Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Argonne Forest, France, October 2, 1918. During an attack, when his platoon encountered enemy wire, Corporal Moore calmly went forward and alone proceeded to cut a passage through the wire. While performing his work he was subjected to the fiercest fire of enemy machine guns and grenades, which wounded over half the platoon. He continued in this work until he accomplished his purpose. Residence at enlistment: Ridgway, Montana.

John J. Murphy, private, first class, Battery F, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Field Artillery. For extraordinary heroism in action near Nantillois, France, October 31, 191 8. Private Murphy displayed a remarkable example of heroism by carrying two wounded men from the gun pit after being seriously wounded himself, when a German shell exploded within a few feet of the piece which was being loaded, setting fire to several boxes of powder and to the camouflage cover of the pit. After carrying the wounded men to safety, he returned to the pit, closed the breech of the piece, verified it's laying, and fired it, preventing what probably would have been a very serious explosion. He was quickly carried to the aid station, where it was found that he had suffered serious burns from the terrific heat, besides being wounded in several places by shell fragments. Residence at enlistment: Butte, Montana.

Vincent A. Nolan (army serial No. 303736), pharmacist's mate, third class, United States Navy, attached to Company E, Fifth Regiment, United States Marine Corps, Second Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Etienne, France, October 5-9, 191 8. During the operations at Blanc Mont Ridge he repeatedly went through intense machine-gun fire and shell fire to administer first aid to officers and soldiers who were wounded and lying in exposed positions. Residence at enlistment: Livingston, Montana.

Cornelius J. O'Brien, sergeant, Company E, Second Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville-Savoye, France, August 11, 1 91 8. While engaged on the construction of a bridge over the Valle River, he voluntarily left shelter during intense fire and carried one of his wounded officers through a heavy machine-gun and artillery fire to a dressing station. Emergency address: Mrs. Mollie Prine, sister, 2 Ridgely Avenue, Butte, Montana. Address at enlistment: same.

Solomon Peterson, sergeant, Company I, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action during the Argonne offensive, France, September 26-29, 191 8. He repeatedly led patrols in successful attacks on enemy machine-gun emplacements, displaying calmness and keen judgment. After being wounded he insisted in remaining in command of his platoon. Residence at enlistment: Mosley, Montana.

Philip W. Prevost (army serial No. 2284906), private first class, Company D, Three Hundred and Sixty-fourth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Eclisfontaine, France, September 28, 1918. A combat group had worked its way far ahead when the remainder of the line was held up by heavy bursts of machine-gun fire, and the order to dig in and hold the position was given. Private Prevost volunteered to carry the message through heavy machine-gun fire to the combat group, which was still advancing. He delivered the order and returned with information which enabled the battalion to make dispositions for the capture of the line of enemy machine-gun nests and the saving of the combat group. Residence at enlistment: Geyser, Montana.

John E. Reese, sergeant, Company F, Three Hundred and Sixteenth Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action at Audenarde, Belgium, November I, 191 8. He volunteered to accompany an officer and three other soldiers on a reconnaissance patrol of the City of Audenarde. Entering the city under heavy shell fire, the party reconnoitered for seven hours, while it was still being patrolled by the enemy, advancing two kilometers ahead of the American outposts and beyond those of the enemy. Residence at enlistment: 415 South Colorado Street, Butte, Montana.

Charles L. Sheridan, captain, Company A, One Hundred and Sixty-third Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action on Hill 230, near Cierges, France, July 31 and August 1, 1918. He demonstrated notable courage and leadership by taking command of the remnants of two companies and leading them up the hill and into the woods against violent fire from the enemy. He personally shot and killed three of the enemy and under his direction six machine guns were put out of action and the hill captured. Residence at appointment: 1022 West Curtis Street, Bozeman, Montana.

Robert A. Simpson (army serial No. 41804), private, Company A, Sixteenth Infantry, First Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Soissons, France, July 22, 1918. After being wounded, Private Simpson returned to the line and continued to carry messages with absolute disregard of his own safety until he was wounded a second time. Residence at enlistment: Shelby, Montana.

Sidney Smith, private, Company H, Three Hundred and Eighth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bainarville, France, October 28, 1918. When his company had been cut off from communication he, though seriously wounded, refused to seek shelter. He participated in several attacks with courage and -aggressiveness, using his rifle very effectively and encouraging his comrades. When relief came he walked back to the dressing station so that medical attention could first be given to the more seriously wounded. Residence at enlistment: Blaine, Montana.

Clayton Evans Snyder, second lieutenant, Ninth Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cunel, France, October 13, 1918. Although wounded by machine-gun fire, he refused to be evacuated, and, going out into No Man's Land, located several enemy machine guns which were endangering his platoon, and directed the fire of his men with such accuracy that the guns were silenced. Residence at appointment: Malta, Montana.

Carl J. Sonstelie, first lieutenant, Third Brigade, Tank Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Montfaucon, France, September 26, 1918. He displayed bravery and leadership of a high order in the advance toward Montfaucon by going out ahead of the engineers, reconnoitering a tank route under fire, and urging the tanks forward. He located the resistance in the Bois de Cuisy in advance, later rallying disorganized soldiers and enabling them to hold that point. Residence at appointment: 628 Third Avenue, West, Kalispell, Montana.

Gilbert Straabe, private, Company D, Three Hundred and Sixty-first Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, Octo her 3, 191 8. He voluntarily and unhesitatingly left shelter under heavy shell fire and without thought of personal danger rendered first aid and carried a wounded comrade to a place of safety. Residence at enlistment: Devon, Montana.

Joseph J. Sullivan, corporal, Company M, Three Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France. Observing that the left flank of the regimental line was unprotected, he voluntarily took out a combat patrol, and, while so doing, encountered three machine guns, which were employing effective enfilade fire. Boldly advancing to this position, he silenced the guns. Residence at enlistment: Jordan, Montana.

Clarence W. Thompson (army serial No. 1039036), sergeant, Battery F, Tenth Field Artillery, Third Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Greves Farm, France, July 15, 1918. Responding to a call for volunteers, Sergeant Thompson, with eight other soldiers, manned two guns of a French battery which had been deserted by the French during the unprecedented fire, after many casualties had been inflicted upon their forces. For two hours he remained at his post and poured an effective fire into the ranks of the enemy. Residence at enlistment: Van Norman, Montana.

Waldo Thompson, corporal, Company C, Second Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Exermont, France, October 5, 1918. He voluntarily went forward in the face of a most destructive bombardment and kept in repair the telephone line connecting the infantry and artillery, thereby assuring the close co-operation between these two elements. Residence at enlistment: 1108 East Sixth Street, Anaconda, Montana.

Hans L. Tveten, private, Company K, Three Hundred and Sixty-third Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Gesnes, France, September 29, 191 8. When his company was under fire from two German machine guns, he crept forward alone and put the guns out of action with rifle grenades, capturing, single-handed, four Germans and both machine guns. Residence at enlistment: Sandcreek, Montana.

Herman Wallenmaier, private, Company D, Sixteenth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the Argonne Forest, France, October 9, 1918. Although suffering painfully from wounds, he remained with his company during the entire action, and then was evacuated only when ordered to leave by his commanding officer, being unable to proceed further because of the loss of blood. Residence at enlistment: Valleytown, Montana.

George Whitcomb, private, Company B, Ninth Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gunel, France, October 12, 1918. Although seriously wounded, he refused to be evacuated until he had gone under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire to four other gun crews, requesting that men be sent to his gun, thereby enabling an important gun to remain in action. Residence at enlistment: Bonnerville Apartments, Helena, Montana.

Cecil J. Widdifield, second lieutenant, Sixth Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Etienne, France, October 5, 19 18. He voluntarily went forward for a distance of 800 meters under heavy shell fire and rescued a wounded soldier who had been left there the night before when the advance patrols had been withdrawn. Residence at appointment: Troy, Montana.

Frank Zilkey, corporal, Company D, Sixteenth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the Forest of Argonne, France, October 9, 1918. After all the other members of his squad had been killed or wounded in advancing on a hostile machine gun, he pressed forward alone in the face of direct fire from the gun, and by remarkable courage captured both the gun and its crew. Upon his own initiative, he then started out alone to attack another gun and was killed. Emergency address, Mrs. J. J. Carr, mother, May, Idaho. Residence at enlistment: Butte, Montana. 

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Source: Montana its Story and Biography, by Tom Strout, Volume 1, The American Historical Society, 1921

 
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