US Place Names ~ Habersham, Georgia to Havilah, California

Habersham; county in Georgia, named for Col. Joseph Habersham, speaker of the general assembly of Georgia in 1785.

Hacienda; town in Santa Clara County, California. A Spanish word meaning "estate."

Hackensack; town in Bergen County, New Jersey. An Indian word; authorities differ as to its meaning, the many versions being "hook mouth," "stream that unites with another on low ground," "on low ground," "land of the big snake."

Hackers; creek in Lewis and Harrison counties. West Virginia. Named for John Hacker, an Indian scout.

Hackettstown; town in Warren County, New Jersey, named for Samuel Hackett, a large landowner.

Hackneyville; town in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, named from the suburb in London.

Haddonfield; borough in Camden County, New Jersey, named for Elizabeth Haddon.

Hadley; mountain and town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Hadley; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named from the parish in Essex, England.

Hadlyme; town in New London County, Connecticut. The name is formed of a combination of the names of the two townships in which it is located Haddam and Lyme.

Hagerstown; city in Washington County, Maryland, named for a German, Jonathan Hager, one of the original proprietors.

Hague; precinct in Alachua County, Florida, and town in Warren County, New York, named from the city in Holland.

Hague; peak in Colorado, named for Arnold Hague of the United States Geological Survey.

Hahn; peak in Colorado;

Hahn Peak; village in Routt County, Colorado. Named for Joe Hahn, an early settler.

Hailey; precinct in Blaine County, Idaho, named for its founder, Hon. John Hailey, of Boise City.

Hainesville; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for S. S. Haines, an early settler.

Halcott; town in Greene County, New York, named for George W. Halcott, sheriff.

Haldane; village in Ogle County, Illinois, named for Alexander Haldane, the first railroad agent.

Hale; county in Alabama, named for Stephen F. Hale, prominent in the State.

Hale; village in Carroll County, Missouri, named for John P. Hale, of Carrollton.

Hale; county in Texas, named for Lieut. J. C. Hale, of the Confederate army.

Hale Eddy; village in Delaware County, New York, named for a family of early settlers.

Half Dome; mountain of granite in California, on the walls of the Yosemite Valley, so named because it has the appearance of a half dome.

Halfmoon; bay in California, so named from its crescent shape.

Halfmoon; town in Saratoga County, New York, so named from a crescent-shaped piece of land between the Hudson and the Mohawk.

Halibut; island off the coast of Alaska, so named on account of the large number of halibut found there.

Halifax; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, county in North Carolina, town in Windham County, Vermont, and county in Virginia, named for George Montague, Earl of Halifax.

Hall; county in Georgia, named for Dr. Lyman Hall, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Hall; county in Nebraska, named for Augustus Hall, former Congressman from Iowa.

Hall; county in Texas, named for an early settler and captain in the war of independence, Warren O. C. Hall.

Halletts Cove; part of New York City, formerly a village in Queens County, New York, which received its name from the original patentee.

Hallowell; city in Kennebec County, Maine, named for Benjamin Hallowell, a large proprietor in the Kennebec patent.

Hallstead; borough in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, named for William F. Hallstead, general manager of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad.

Hallsville; village in Montgomery County, New York, named for Capt. Robert Hall.

Halseyville; village in Tompkins County, New York, named for the first settler, Nicholl Halsey.

Halstead; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for the journalist, Murat Halstead.

Hamblen; county in Tennessee, named for Hezekiah Hamblen.

Hamburg; towns in Erie County, New York, and Aiken County, South Carolina, and twenty other places, named from the city in Germany.

Hamersville; village in Brown County, Ohio, named for Gen. Thomas Lyon Hamer.

Hamilton; counties in Florida, Illinois, Indiana, and Kansas; town in Essex County, Massachusetts; counties in New York, Ohio, and Tennessee; probably the county in Nebraska; and many cities, towns, and villages; named for the statesman, Alexander Hamilton.

Hamilton; town in Harris County, Georgia, named for General Hamilton, governor of South Carolina.

Hamilton; city in Hancock County, Illinois, named for Artois Hamilton, a first settler.

Hamilton; county in Iowa, named for William W. Hamilton, president of the sen-ate in 1857.

Hamilton; county in Texas, named for James Hamilton, of South Carolina, a sympathizer and helper of Texas in its war.

Hamlet; village in Richmond County, North Carolina, named for its founder.

Hamlin; city in Brown County, Kansas, plantation in Aroostook County, Maine, county in South Dakota, and several other places, named for Hannibal Hamlin.

Hammond; village in Piatt County, Illinois, named for Charles Goodrich Ham-mond, railway manager.

Hammond; city in Lake County, Indiana, named for Abram Hammond, twelfth governor, 1860-61.

Hammond; town in Presque County, Michigan, named for Stephen Hammond.

Hammond; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Abijah Hammond, an early proprietor.

Hammonton; town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, named for a family of former residents.

Hammonville; town in Hart County, Kentucky, named for a resident.

Hampden; county, and town in same county, in Massachusetts, and town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for the English patriot, John Hampden.

Hampshire; counties in Massachusetts and West Virginia, named from the county in England.

Hampstead; village in Carroll County, Maryland; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire; and villages in Pender County, North Carolina, and King George County, Virginia, named from the parish in England.

Hampton; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, and twenty-five other places, directly or indirectly named from the parish in Middlesex, England.

Hampton; county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, named for Gen. Wade Hampton.

Hamptonburg; town in Orange County, New York, named from the birthplace, Wolverhampton, of William Bull, the first settler.

Hampton Roads; Virginia; a channel between Chesapeake Bay and the estuary of James River. Scene of the naval battle between the Monitor and Merrimac, March 9, 1862.

Hancock; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Kentucky; county, and town in same county, in Maine; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; county in Mississippi; mountain in New Hampshire; town in Delaware County, New York; and counties in Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia; named for John Hancock, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Many other places in the United States are named for the same man.

Hancock; mount in Yellowstone Park, named for Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock.

Hand; county in South Dakota, named for George A. Hand, Territorial secretary in 1880.

Handsboro; town in Harrison County, Mississippi, named for a northern man who established a foundry there before the civil war.

Hanford; city in Kings County, California, named for one of the earliest settlers.

Hanging Rock; village in Lawrence County, Ohio, named from the presence of a cliff at the back of the town.

Hangmans; creek in Washington, tributary of the Spokane River, so named because a number of Indians were hanged on its bank.

Hanna; township in Henry County, Illinois, named for Rev. Philip Hanna, a first settler.

Hanna; reef and island in Texas, probably named for Captain Hanna, captain of the Leonidas, in 1837.

Hannacrois; creek in New York, said to have been named by the Dutch hanne-kraai, meaning "cock-crowing creek," from the legend that a rooster floated down this creek on a cake of ice.

Hannibal; town in Oswego County, New York, named by the State land board, being situated in the military tract given to the surviving soldiers of the Revolution;

Hannibal; city in Marion County, Missouri. Named for the Carthaginian general.

Hanover; city in Washington County, Kansas, town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, county in Virginia, and several other places, named for the Duke of Hanover, afterwards George I of England, or from the Prussian province and city belonging to him.

Hansford; county in Texas, named for John M. Hansford, who was a judge and lawyer there during the days of the Republic.

Hanson; county in South Dakota, named for Joseph R. Hanson, clerk of the first legislature.

Happy Camp; town in Siskiyou County, so called by miners in the early days of prosperity.

Haralson; county, and village in Coweta County, in Georgia, named for Gen. Hugh

A. Haralson, former congressman from that State.

Harbeson; village in Sussex County, Delaware, named for Harbeson Hickman, a large landowner.

Harbine; village in Thayer County, Nebraska, named for Col. John Harbine.

Hardeman; county in Texas, named for two brothers, Bailey and T. J. Hardeman, prominent citizens in the days of the Republic; and a county in Tennessee, named for one of the brothers, Col. T. J. Hardeman.

Hardenburg; town in Ulster County, New York, named for Johannes Hardenburg, an early patentee in Delaware and Sullivan counties.

Hardin; county, and village in Calhoun County, in Illinois; counties in Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee, and several towns and villages, named for Col. John J. Hardin, who was killed in the Mexican war.

Hardin; city in Ray County, Missouri, named for Gov. Charles H. Hardin, 1875-1877.

Hardin; county in Texas, named for the family of William Hardin, of Liberty.

Hardin Factory; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for the builder of the factory.

Hardinsburg; town in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, named for Capt. William Hardin, a pioneer.

Hardwick; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Philip Yorke, Lord Hardwicke, a member of the privy council.

Hardy; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, named for a railroad official.

Hardy; county in West Virginia, named for Samuel Hardy, a member of Congress from Virginia in 1784.

Hardy Station; town in Grenada County, Mississippi, named by the railroad company for Richard Hardy, the owner of the land upon which the depot was built.

Harford; county, and village in same county, in Maryland, named for Henry Harford, the natural son of Lord Baltimore, the sixth, and proprietor at the time of the Revolution.

Harlan; city in Shelby County, Iowa, named for Senator Harlan.

Harlan; village in Smith County, Kansas, named for John C. Harlan, one of the first settlers.

Harlan; county, and town in same county, in Kentucky, named for Maj. Silas Harlan.

Harlan; county in Nebraska, named for James Harlan, secretary of the interior, 1865-66.

Harlem; part of New York City and the channel which extends northward from Hell Gate, connecting with the Hudson, named from the town in Holland.

Harleyville; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina, named for a resident family.

Harman; village in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for L. B. Harman, its founder.

Harmer; township and village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for the Hon. Harmer Denny.

Harmony; borough in Butler County, Pennsylvania, named by a colony of Germans to indicate the principle of its organization.

Harnett; county in North Carolina, named for Cornelius Harnett, an American statesman.

Hamey; county, city in same county, and lake in Oregon, named for General Harney.

Harper; county in Kansas, named for Marion Harper, first sergeant Company E, Second Kansas Regiment.

Harpers Ferry; town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, named for Robert Harper, who settled there in 1734 and established a ferry.

Harpersfield; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Joseph Harper, an original patentee.

Harpersfield; township in Ashtabula County, Ohio, named from the town in New York.

Harperville; village in Scott County, Mississippi, named for G. W. Harper, an old resident.

Harpswell; town in Cumberland County, Maine, probably named from the town in England.

Harrellsville; town in Hertford County, North Carolina, named for a former resident.

Harriet; lake in Minnesota, named for the wife of Colonel Leavenworth.

Harrietstown; town in Franklin County, New York, named for the wife of James Duane.

Harrietta; village in Wexford County, Michigan, a combination of the names of the manager of the Ann Arbor Railroad, Harry, and that of his wife, Henrietta.

Harrington; town in Kent County, Delaware, named for the Hon. Samuel M. Harrington, at one time chancellor of the State.

Harris; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Harris; county in Georgia, named for Charles Harris, a prominent lawyer and judge.

Harris; county in Texas, named for John R. Harris, who erected the first steam sawmill in Texas (1829).

Harrisburg; township and city in Saline County, Illinois, named for a family of first settlers.

Harrisburg; town in Lewis County, New York, named for Richard Harrison, of New York.

Harrisburg; city in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named for John Harris, the original proprietor.

Harrison; counties in Indiana, Iowa, and Mississippi; town in Gloucester County, New Jersey, and twenty other places, named for President William Henry Harrison.

Harrison; counties in Kentucky and West Virginia, named for Col. Benjamin Harrison, father of William Henry Harrison.

Harrison; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for Harrison Gray Otis, of Boston.

Harrison; town in Tallahatchie County, Mississippi, named for James T. Harrison, a prominent lawyer.

Harrison; county, and city in Cass County in Missouri, named for Albert G. Harrison, of Callaway County, member of Congress in 1838.

Harrison; town in Westchester County, New York, named for John Harrison.

Harrison; county in Texas, named for an early pioneer.

Harrisonburg; village in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana, and town in Rockingham County, Virginia, named for the Harrisons of Virginia.

Harrisville; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Milan Harris, who established a mill there.

Harrisville; town in Lewis County, New York, named for Fosket Harris, the first settler.

Harrisville; village in Medina County, Ohio, named for Joseph Harris, a pioneer.

Harrisville; town in Ritchie County, West Virginia, named for Gen. Thomas Harris.

Harrodsburg; city in Mercer County, Kentucky, named for Col. James Harrod, who built the first cabin.

Hart; county in Georgia, named for Nancy Hart, the celebrated Georgia heroine of the Revolution.

Hart; county in Kentucky, named for Nathaniel Hart, an officer of the War of 1812.

Hart; township and village in Oceana County, Michigan. The name was originally "Heart," to signify the center of the county.

Hart; river and lake in Yellowstone Park, named for Hart Hunney, an old hunter. Others say it was named "Heart" from its shape.

Hartford; county, and city in same county, in Connecticut, and twenty other cities, towns, and villages, the name being transferred from England.

Hartford; city in Lyon County, Kansas, township in Trumbull County, Ohio, town in Windsor County, Vermont, and village in Mason County, West Virginia;

Hartford City; city in Blackford County, Indiana. Named from the city in Connecticut.

Hartley; county in Texas, named for O. C. and R. K. Hartley, distinguished members of the bar in the days of the Texas revolution.

Hartsgrove; township in Ashtabula County, Ohio, named for Richard Hart, of Connecticut.

Hartsville; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Gideon B. Hart, a pioneer.

Hartsville; town in Darlington County, South Carolina, named for a resident family.

Hartwick; town in Otsego County, New York, named for Christopher Hartwick, patentee.

Harvard; mountain in Colorado, and city in McHenry County, Illinois, named from the university.

Harvard; university in Cambridge, Middlesex County, and town in Worcester County, Massachusetts. Named for the Rev. John Harvard, who founded the university.

Harvey; county in Kansas, named for James M. Harvey, captain Company G, Tenth Kansas Regiment, governor, and United States Senator.

Harwich; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named from the seaport in Essex County, England.

Harwinton; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut. The name is formed from

Hartford and Windsor, of which it originally comprised two half townships.

Hasbrouck Heights; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for Mr. Hasbrouck, the principal owner of the land upon which the borough is located.

Hasenclever; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for a German who received a grant of land there.

Haskell; county in Kansas, named for Dudley C. Haskell, a former member of Congress.

Haskell; county in Texas, named for Charles Haskell, of Tennessee.

Hastings; city in Barry County, Michigan, named for Eurotas P. Hastings, formerly auditor-general of the State.

Hastings; city in Dakota County, Minnesota, named for Henry Hastings Sibley, one of the proprietors.

Hastings; city in Adams County, Nebraska, named for Col. T. D. Hastings, who was instrumental in introducing a railroad through the town.

Hatboro; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, so named because of its extensive hat factories.

Hatchechubee; town in Russell County, Alabama. A combination of the Creek Indian words hatchie, "creek," and chubba, "halfway," "the middle."

Hatchie; river in Tennessee. An Indian word meaning "small river."

Hatfield; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England.

Hatteras; township and cape in Dare County, North Carolina, named for a tribe of Indians.

Hattiesburg; town in Perry County, Mississippi, named for the wife of Capt. W. H. Hardy, its founder.

Havana; township and city in Mason County, Illinois, named from the city in Cuba.

Havensville; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named for Paul E. Havens, of Leavenworth.

Haverford; township in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in Wales.

Haverhill; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England.

Haverhill; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named from the town in Massachusetts.

Haverstraw; town in Rockland County, New York, named by the early Dutch haverstroo, meaning "oats straw."

Havilah; town in Kern County, California, named from the Bible, the word meaning "land of gold."

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

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