US Place Names ~ Jacinto, California to Junius, New York

Jacinto; towns in Glenn County, California, and Alcorn County, Mississippi. A Spanish word meaning "hyacinth."

Jack; county in Texas;

Jacksboro; town in Jack County, Texas. Named for William Houston and Patrick Jack, brothers, early settlers and prominent citizens in the days of the republic.

Jackson; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; counties in Michigan, Mississippi, and Missouri; town in Carroll County, New Hampshire; county in North Carolina; county, and city in same county, in Ohio; counties in Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; and many other places, named for Gen. Andrew Jackson.

Jackson; mountain in the Sawatch Range in Colorado, named for the photographer, W. H. Jackson.

Jackson; county in Georgia, named for Gen. James Jackson, United States Senator from that State.

Jackson; town in Waldo County, Maine, named for Henry Jackson, a contemporary of Colonel Knox in the Revolution.

Jackson; county, and city in same county, in Minnesota, named for Henry Jackson, the first merchant of Saint Paul.

Jackson; river in western Virginia, named for the first settler on its banks.

Jackson; lake in Wyoming, named for David Jackson, a noted mountaineer.

Jacksonville; city in Morgan County, Illinois, named for a prominent colored preacher.

Jacksonville; town in Randolph County, Missouri, and village in Onslow County, North Carolina, named for Gen. Andrew Jackson.

Jacoby; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Jaffray; town in Cheshire County, and southern point of entrance to Portsmouth Harbor, New Hampshire, named for George Jaffray, one of the original proprietors, and later a chief justice of the State.

Jalama; town in Santa Barbara County, California. From the Spanish jalma, meaning "pack saddle."

Jamaica; town in Queens County, New York. An Indian word meaning, according to some authorities, "country abounding in springs;" according to others, "land of water and wood."

James; peak in Colorado, named for the botanist.

James; county in Tennessee, named for Jesse J. James.

James; river in Virginia, named for James I of England.

Jamesburg; borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, named for a resident family.

James City; county in Virginia, named for the first English settlement, Jamestown.

Jamestown; town in Boone County, Indiana, named for James Mattock, its founder.

Jamestown; city in Cloud County, Kansas, named for James P. Pomeroy, of the Central Branch Union Pacific Railroad.

Jamestown; city in Chautauqua County, New York, named for James Pendergast, an early settler.

Jamestown; village in Greene County, Ohio, named for James Browder, a first settler.

Jamestown; town in Newport County, Rhode Island, named for the Duke of York and Albany, later James II of England.

Jamestown; town in James City County, Virginia, named for King James I, and the first English settlement in America.

Jamesville; village in Onondaga County, New York, named for James De Witt

Jamesville; town in Martin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen.

Janesville; town in Lassen County, California, and city in Rock County, Wisconsin, named for Henry F. Janes, of Wisconsin.

Janesville; town in Bremer County, Iowa, named for the wife of John T. Barrick, its founder.

Jara; creek in Colorado. A Spanish word, literally "rock rose," but in connection with the creek meaning "willow brush."

Jarrolds; village in West Virginia, named for a resident family.

Jasonville; village in Greene County, Indiana, named for Jason Rogers, one of its founders.

Jasper; county, and town in Pickens County, in Georgia; counties in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, and Missouri; town in Steuben County, New York; county in Texas; and many other places; named for Sergt. William Jasper, of Fort Moultrie (S. C.) fame, who was killed in the siege of Savannah.

Java; town in Wyoming County, New York, named from the island in the Malay Archipelago. A Malay word meaning "the land of nutmegs."

Jay; county in Indiana, towns in Franklin County, Maine, Essex County, New York, and Orleans County, Vermont, named for Hon. John Jay, an eminent statesman, proprietor, and early governor of New York.

Jeddo; village in Orleans County, New York, and borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named from the capital of Japan, the old name of Tokyo.

Jeff Davis; county in Texas, named for Jefferson Davis.

Jefferson; counties in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; counties in Mississippi, Missouri, and Montana; town in Coos County, and peak of the White Mountains, in New Hampshire; county in New York; mount in Oregon; counties in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; probably the counties in Alabama, Florida, Nebraska, and Ohio; and many towns And villages; named for President Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson; town in Ashe County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen.

Jefferson; county in Texas, named for Jefferson Beaumont, an early settler and prominent citizen.

Jekyl; island in Georgia, named for Sir Joseph Jekyl.

Jenkintown; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for William Jenkins, early settler.

Jennings; county in Indiana, named for Jonathan Jennings, first governor of the State.

Jenny; lake in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for the Shoshone wife of Richard Leigh.

Jenny Lind; town in Calaveras County, California, named for the Swedish songstress.

Jerauld; county in South Dakota, named for H. J. Jerauld, legislator.

Jericho; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named from the ancient city in Palestine.

Jerome; town in Bladen County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen.

Jeromeville, village in Ashland County, Ohio, named for John Baptiste Jerome, a French trader.

Jersey; county in Illinois, named from the State of New Jersey.

Jersey City; city in Hudson County, New Jersey, originally called the "city of Jersey," named from one of the channel islands of England.

Jersey Shore; town in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, named by the first settlers for their native State, New Jersey.

Jerseyville; city in Jersey County, Illinois, named from the State of New Jersey.

Jerusalem; towns in Lake County, California, and Yates County, New York, named from the ancient city of Jerusalem. A Hebrew name meaning "foundation of peace."

Jessamine; county and creek in Kentucky, named for Jessamine Douglass, the daughter of an early settler.

Jessup; village in Antelope County, Nebraska, named for ex-Governor Jessup, of Iowa.

Jesup; town in Buchanan County, Iowa, named for Morris K. Jesup, of New York.

Jetmore; city in Hodgeman County, Kansas, named for Col. A. B. Jetmore, of Topeka.

Jewell; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Lieut. Col. Lewis R. Jewell, Sixth Kansas Cavalry.

Jewett; town in Greene County, New York, named for Freeborn G. Jewett, justice of the supreme court.

Jewett; village in Harrison County, Ohio, named for T. M. Jewett, former president of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad.

Jo Daviess; county in Illinois, named for Col. Joseph Hamilton Daviess, of Kentucky, killed in the battle of Tippecanoe.

Joe Gee; hill in Orange County, New York, named for the last Indian who had his cabin on the hill.

Joes; brook near Walden, Vermont, named for Captain Joe, a friendly Indian of the St. Francis tribe.

Johannesburg; mining town in Kern County, California, named from the city in South Africa.

John Day; river, and town in Grant County, in Oregon, named for a member of Hunt's Astoria overland expedition.

Johns; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Johnsburg; town in Warren County, New York, named for John Thurman, an early settler.

Johnson; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Benjamin Johnson.

Johnson; county in Georgia, named for Governor H. V. Johnson.

Johnson; county in Indiana, named for John Johnson, judge of the supreme court of the State.

Johnson; counties in Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, and Nebraska, named for Richard Johnson, vice-president of the United States.

Johnson; county in Iowa, named for Andrew Johnson.

Johnson; county in Kansas, named for Rev. Thomas Johnson, missionary to the Shawnees.

Johnson; city in Stanton County, Kansas, named for Col. Alexander S. Johnson, of Topeka.

Johnson; village in Nemaha County, Nebraska, named for Julius A. Johnson, large landowner.

Johnson; county in Tennessee, named for Samuel Johnson.

Johnson; county in Texas, named for M. G. Johnson, a member of the Texas congress.

Johnson; town in Lamoille County, Vermont, named for the proprietor, William S. Johnson.

Johnson; county in Wyoming, named for E. P. Johnson, a member of the legislature at the time of the organization of the county.

Johnson City; town in Washington County, Tennessee, named for an early settler.

Johnsons; creek in New York, named for Sir William Johnson, who encamped on its banks when on his way to Fort Niagara.

Johnsonville; town in Humphreys County, Tennessee, named for Andrew Johnson.

Johnston; town in Rhode Island, named for Augustus J. Johnston, attorney-general of the colony.

Johnston; pass in Utah, named for Gen. A. S. Johnston.

Johnstons; county in North Carolina, named for Gabriel Johnston, governor.

Johnstown; city in Fulton County, New York, named for its founder. Sir William Johnson.

Johnstown; city, and borough in Cambria County, in Pennsylvania, named for an early settler, Joseph Jahns or Yahns.

Joliet; township and city in Will County, Illinois, first called Juliet, for Juliet Campbell, daughter of the founder. By an act of the Illinois General Assembly the name was changed to Joliet, the name of the explorer.

Jones; county in Georgia, named for James Jones, member of Congress from that State.

Jones; county in Iowa, named for George W. Jones, United States Senator from that State.

Jones; county in Mississippi, named for Commodore John Paul Jones.

Jones; county in North Carolina, named for William Jones, a North Carolina statesman.

Jones; county in Texas, named for Anson Jones, one of the first Senators in the United States Congress from Texas.

Jones; creek in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for Col. W. A. Jones, United States Army, its first explorer.

Jonesboro; township and city in Craighead County, Arkansas, named for Senator William A. Jones.

Jonesboro; city in Union County, Illinois, named for Doctor Jones, a prominent settler.

Jonesboro; town in Washington County, Maine, named for John C. Jones, one of the original proprietors.

Jonesboro; town in Washington County, Tennessee, named for William Jones, a North Carolinian statesman.

Jonesburg; town in Montgomery County, Missouri, named for the first settler.

Jonesport; town in Washington County, Maine, named for John C. Jones, one of the original proprietors.

Jonesville; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Benjamin Jones, its founder.

Jonesville; village in Hillsdale County, Michigan, named for an early settler.

Jonesville; town in Union County, South Carolina, named for a resident family.

Joplin; city in Jasper County, Missouri, named from Joplin Creek, which was named for Rev. H. G. Joplin, who lived on its banks.

Joppa; post-offices in Cullman County, Alabama, and Harford County, Maryland, and several towns and villages, the name being transferred from the ancient city in Palestine. A Hebrew word meaning "beauty."

Jordan; villages in New London County, Connecticut, and Onondaga County, New York, stream in Utah, and 25 other places, the name being transferred from the river in Palestine. A Hebrew word meaning "descender."

Joseph; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for the famous Nez Perce, Chief Joseph.

Josephine; county in Oregon, named for Josephine Rollins, the daughter of the discoverer of the first gold in that county.

Juab; county in Utah, named for a friendly Indian of the region.

Juan de Fuca; strait separating Washington from Vancouver Island, named for a Greek navigator in the Spanish service, who explored it.

Judith; river in Montana, named for Miss Hancock, of Fincastle, Virginia.

Judsonia; town in White County, Arkansas, named for Rev. Adoniram Judson, a Baptist missionary.

Juhelville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Madame Juhel, a relative of the Le Ray family.

Julesburg; town in Sedgwick County, Colorado, said to be named for Jules Benard, a frontiersman.

Julien; township in Dubuque County, Iowa, named for Julien Dubuque, the French trader for whom the county was named.

Junction; city in Geary County, Kansas, so named because it is near the junction of the Republican and Smoky Hill rivers.

Junction; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, so named because it is situated at the junction of two railroads.

Junction; butte in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, so named In^cause it is at the junction of the Yellowstone and Lamar rivers.

June; mountain in the town of Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Benjamin June, who lived on the mountain.

Juneau; city in Alaska, named for Joseph Juneau, a gold prospector of 1851.

Juneau; county, and city in Dodge County, in Wisconsin, named for the founder of Milwaukee.

Juniata; county, river, and township in Perry County, in Pennsylvania;

Juniataville; village in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. From an Indian word which means "they stay long," or, according to another derivation, "beyond the great bend."

Junius; town in Seneca County, New York, named by the State land board for Junius, of the classics.

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

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