US Place Names ~ Kahoka, Missouri to Kwichluak, Alaska

Kahoka; city in Clark County, Missouri. See Cahokia,

Kaibab; plateau in Arizona. An Indian word meaning "mountain lying down."

Kalama; town in Cowlitz County, Washington, probably named from the Indian, okala kalama, meaning "goose."

Kalamazoo; county, city in same county, and river in Michigan. According to one authority the name is derived from the Indian word, negikanamazo, meaning "otter tail." "Beautiful water," "boiling water," and "stones like otters" are other translations.

Kalispel; city in Flathead County, Montana, named for an Indian tribe.

Kamas; town in Summit County, Utah. The Indian name for Oamassia esculenta, the root of which is used as food by the Indians of the Pacific coast.

Kamrar; town in Hamilton County, Iowa, named for Senator Kamrar.

Kanab; town, creek, and plateau in Kane County, Utah. A Ute Indian word, meaning "willow."

Kanabec; county in Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "snake." The usual Ojibway word given by these Indians to the Snake River flowing through the county.

Kandiyohi; county, and town in same county in Minnesota. From the Sioux Indian kandi, meaning "buffalo fish," and ohi, "arrive in."

Kane; county in Illinois, named for Elias Kent Kane, Unite States Senator from Illinois, 1824-1835.

Kane; town in McKean County, Pennsylvania, named for a resident family.

Kane; county in Utah;

Kaneville; town in Kane County, Illinois. Named for Gen. Thomas L. Kane, of Philadelphia.

Kanopolis; city in Ellsworth County, Kansas. The name is a combination of Kansas and Centropolis, Ellsworth being the central county of the State.

Kansas; State of the Union, river in same State, and nation in Oklahoma;

Kansas City; cities in Wyandotte County, Kansas, and Jackson County, Missouri. Named for an Indian tribe.

Kaolin; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, so named because of the large deposits of kaolin.

Kappa; village in Woodford County, Illinois, named from the Kappa Indians.

Karnes; county in Texas, named for Henry Karnes, an early settler and Indian fighter.

Karsaootuk; stream in northern Maine. An Indian word meaning "black river," or "pine stream."

Kaskaskia; town in Randolph County, Illinois, and river in the same State. An Indian word of unknown meaning, the name of a tribe of Illinois Indians.

Kasota; village in Lesueur County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "cleared," "cleared off," or "sky clear from clouds."

Kasson; village in Dodge County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "to use up."

Katahdin; mountain in Maine. An Indian word meaning, according to different authorities, "highest land," "big mountain," "chief mountain."

Katchenaha; lake in Florida. An Indian word meaning "turkey lake."

Katellen; village in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named for Kate Ellen Brodhead.

Katonah; village in Westchester County, New York, named for an Indian chief. The word means "sickly."

Kaufman; county, and city in same county, in Texas, named for David S. Kaufman, a former congressman.

Kaukauna; city in Outagamie County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, which, according to different authorities, means "portage," "long portage," "place where pickerel are caught," "place of pike."

Kay; county in Oklahoma, formerly written "K," alphabetically lettered.

Kearney; county, and city in Buffalo County, in Nebraska, and town in Hudson County, New Jersey, named for Gen. Philip Kearny.

Kearney; city in Clay County, Missouri, named for Gen. Stephen W. Kearny.

Kearny; county in Kansas, named for Gen. Philip Kearny.

Kearsarge; mountain in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "peaked mountain," or koouras, "pointed mountain," "highest place;" another authority gives "proud" or "selfish."

Keene; city in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Sir Benjamin Keene.

Keeseville; village in Essex County, New York, named for its founder, Richard Keith; county in Nebraska, named for John Keith, of North Platte, Nebraska.

Keithsburg; township, and city in Mercer County, Illinois, named for an early settler.

Kelleys Island; township, and village in Erie County, Ohio, named from an island in Lake Erie, which was owned by Datus and Irad Kelly.

Kellogg; town in Jasper County, Iowa, named for an early settler.

Kemper; county in Mississippi, named for Col. Reuben Kemper, an American soldier in the Florida and Mexican wars.

Kemper City; town in Victoria County, Texas, named for Captain Kemper.

Kenansville; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for Hon. James Kenan, member of Congress.

Kendall; county in Illinois, and town in Orleans County, New York, named for Hon. Amos Kendall, Postmaster-General of the United States, 1835-1840.

Kendall; county in Texas, named for George W. Kendall, a prominent citizen.

Kendallville; city in Noble County, Indiana, named for Amos Kendall, Postmaster-General under President Jackson.

Kenduskeag; town and river in Penobscot County, Maine. An Indian word meaning "little eel river," or "place for taking salmon."

Kenly; town in Johnston County, North Carolina, named for a prominent railroad official.

Kennard; town in Washington County, Nebraska, named for Hon. Thomas P. Kennard, Secretary of State, 1867.

Kennebec; county and river in Maine; the word is said to mean "long lake."

Kennebunk; town in York County, Maine;

Kennebunkport; town in York County, Maine. An Indian name, said to mean "long water place."

Kenner; city in Jefferson County, Louisiana, named for Duncan F. Kenner, an eminent lawyer of that State.

Kennett Square; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named from the village of Kennett, Wiltshire, England.

Kenney; village in Dewitt County, Illinois, named for Moses Kenney, its founder.

Kenosha; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "fish," "pickerel," "pike."

Kenoza; lake in Essex County, Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning "pickerel."

Kensington; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named from the parish in England.

Kent; counties in Delaware, Maryland, and Rhode Island, named from the county of Kent in England.

Kent; county in Michigan, named for Chancellor Kent of New York.

Kent; town in Putnam County, New York, named for a family of early settlers.

Kent; village in Portage County, Ohio, named for a family of extensive real-estate holders.

Kent; county in Texas, named for R. Kent, an early settler.

Kentland; town in Newton County, Indiana, named for A. J. Kent, who laid out the town.

Kenton; county in Kentucky and city in Hardin County, Ohio, named for Gen. Simon Kenton, pioneer of Kentucky.

Kentucky; State of the Union. An Indian word of uncertain meaning.

Kentwood; town in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, named for a local merchant, Amacker Kent.

Keokuk; county, and city in Lee County, in Iowa, named for an Indian chief, the word meaning "running fox" or "watchful fox."

Keosauqua; town in Van Buren County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning "great bend," so named for a bend in the Dee Moines River.

Keota; town in Keokuk, County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning either "gone to visit" or "the fire is gone out."

Kern; county, city in same county, and river in California, named for three brothers.

Kernersville; town in Forsyth County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen.

Kerr; county in Texas;

Kerrville; town in Kerr County, Texas. Named for James Kerr, a prominent early settler.

Kershaw; county, and town in Lancaster County, in South Carolina, named for the Kershaw family, early settlers.

Keshena; town in Shawano County, Wisconsin, named for an Indian chief, the word meaning "swift flying."

Keswick; town in Shasta County, California, named by English mine owners from the city in England.

Ketchum; precinct in Blaine County, Idaho, named for David Ketchum, a pioneer settler.

Ketten Chow; valley in California. An Indian name meaning "cammas valley."

Kewanee; township and city in Henry County, Illinois. An Indian word, same as kewaunee.

Kewaskum; village in Washington County, Wisconsin, named for an old Indian chief, the word meaning "returning track."

Kewaunee; county, city in same county, and river in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "prairie hen" or "wild duck;" or, according to another authority, "to go around."

Keweenaw; county in Michigan; the vicinity was so named by the Indians because of the point of land which projects into Lake Superior; the word means "canoe carried back," "carrying place," hence, a portage.

Keyapaha; county and river in Nebraska. A Sioux Indian word meaning "turtle hills.

Keyser; town in Moore County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen.

Keyser; town in Mineral County, West Virginia, named for an officer of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

Keystone; towns in Wells County, Indiana, and Dickey County, North Dakota, named by its Pennsylvania settlers for the Keystone State.

Keytesville; city in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Rev. Keyte, an early settler.

Key West; city on Thompsons Island, or Bone Key, Monroe County, Florida, named for its location on one of the most westerly keys. Bone Key is a translation of the Spanish, cayo hueso, meaning "bone reef," so named because of the bones found upon the island.

Kezar; village in Gunnison County, Colorado, named for Gardner H. Kezar.

Kezar; ponds in Oxford County, Maine, named for an old hunter.

Khartoum; town in San Bernardino County, named from the city in Egypt.

Kickapoo; town in Peoria County, Illinois, township in Leavenworth County, Kansas, town in Anderson County, Texas, and river in Wisconsin, named from an Indian tribe.

Kidder; village in Caldwell County, Missouri, named from the Kidder Land Company, of Boston, who laid out the town.

Kidder; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Jefferson P. Kidder, prominent in the State's political affairs.

Kidron; town in Coweta County, Georgia, named from the brook near Jerusalem.

Kilbourn City; village in Columbia County, Wisconsin, named for Byron Kilbourn, a pioneer.

Kilbuck; town in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania;

Killbuck; town in Wayne County, Ohio. Named for a chief of the Delaware Indians.

Kildare; township in Juneau County, Wisconsin, named from the town in Ireland.

Kilkenny; village in Lesueur County, Minnesota, named from the town in Ireland.

Killingworth; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, intended by its Scotch settlers to be named Kenilworth, but, by the mistake of the clerk of the court, named as above.

Kilmarnock; town in Lancaster County, Virginia, named from the town in Scotland.

Kimball; county in Nebraska, named for John P. Kimball.

Kimball; township and city in Brule County, South Dakota, named for F. W. Kimball, chief engineer of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railroad.

Kimble; county in Texas, named for George C. Kimble, an early settler.

Kimbolton; village in Guernsey County, Ohio, named from the town in England.

Kincaid; city in Anderson County, Kansas, named for Robert Kincaid, of Mound City.

Kinderhook; town in Columbia County, New York. The Anglicized form of kinder hoeck, the name given the place by Henry Hudson, meaning "children's point," on account of the many Indian children.

Kineo; mountain in Maine. An Indian word, meaning "high bluff."

King; peak in Humboldt County, California, named for Captain King, of the United States Army.

King; county in Texas, named for William King, a prominent citizen.

King; county in Washington, named for William Rufus King, former Vice-President of the United States.

King and Queen; county in Virginia, founded in 1691, and named for William and Mary, of England.

Kingfisher; county in Oklahoma; so named on account of the great number of birds of this species which live on the banks of Kingfisher Creek within the county.

King George; county in Virginia, named for King George I of England.

Kingman; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Chief Justice S. A. Kingman.

Kingman; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for R. S. Kingman.

Kingman; pass in Yellowstone Park, named for Lieut. D. C. Kingman, United States Army.

Kings; peak in Humboldt County, California, named for Captain King.

Kings; county in New York, named for the Stuart dynasty.

Kingsbury; plantation in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Hon. Sanford Kingsbury, of Gardiner.

Kingsbury; county in South Dakota, named for C. W. Kingsbury, an early legislator.

Kingsley; town in Plymouth County, Iowa, named for Hon. J. T. Kingsley, a prominent railroad official.

Kingsley; village in Grand Traverse County, Michigan, named for Judson Kingsley, who gave the site for the railway depot.

Kingston; town in Barton County, Georgia, named for J. P. King, of Augusta.

Kingston; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for Evelyn Pierrepont, first Duke of Kingston.

Kingston; village in Tuscola County, Michigan, named for two families, King and Kingsbury.

Kingston; city in Caldwell County, Missouri, named for an early governor, Austin A. King.

Kingston; city in Ulster County, New York, named from the city in England.

Kingstree; town in Williamsburg County, South Carolina; so named because of the presence of a lai^ pine tree on the bank of Black River.

Kingsville; village in Johnson County, Missouri, named for Gen. William M. King, who located it.

King William; county in Virginia, founded in 1701, and named for William III of England.

Kinnans; pond in Humboldt County, California, named for Seth Kinman, an early settler.

Kinmundy; township and city in Marion County, Illinois, named from Kinmondy in Scotland.

Kinney; county in Texas, named for an early settler, H. L. Kinney.

Kinnikinnick; village in Rose County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning a mixture of tobacco and red willow bark.

Kinsale; village in Westmoreland County, Virginia, named from the town in Ireland.

Kinsey; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Kinsley; city in Edwards County, Kansas, named for W. E. W. Kinsley, of Boston, Massachusetts.

Kinsman; township in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for a pioneer family.

Kinston; town in Lenoir County, North Carolina, named for King George III of England.

Kinzua; creek in Central Pennsylvania, meaning, according to S. M. Sener, "they gobble," referring to the wild turkeys that congregated on its banks.

Kiowa; county and river in Colorado, county, and city in Barber County, in Kansas, and county in Oklahoma. Named from the Kiowa Indian tribe. The meaning of the word is unknown.

Kirkland; town in Oneida County, New York, named for Rev. Samuel Kirkland.

Kirklin; town in Clinton County, Indiana, named for Nathan Kirk, its founder.

Kirklin; town in Clinton County, New York, named for Martin Kirk, proprietor.

Kirksville; city in Adair County, Missouri, named for Jesse Kirk.

Kirkwood; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, and township in Belmont County, Ohio, named for Maj. Robert Kirkwood, a Revolutionary officer.

Kirkwood; town in St. Louis County, Missouri, named for the first chief engineer of the Missouri Pacific Railway.

Kirtland; township in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for Judge Turnhand Kirtland.

Kirwin; city in Phillips County, Kansas, named for Col. John Kirwin, of the Regular Army.

Kishacolquillas; creek, and village in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, named for a Delaware Indian chief; the meaning is said to be "the snakes are already in their dens."

Kishwaukee; river and town in Winnebago County, Illinois. An Indian word which means "sycamore tree."

Kiskiminitas; township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word meaning "make daylight."

Kisnop; creek in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and the outlet of Twin Lakes in Salisbury, Connecticut, named for John Sconnoup, an early Dutch settler, of whose name Kisnop is a corruption.

"Kit Carson; county, and town in Cheyenne County, in Colorado, named for the Rocky Mountain guide.

Kitsap; county in Washington, named for Kitsap, a former noted Indian chief of that region.

Kittanning; borough in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, located on the site of an Indian village. The name is corrupted from the Delaware Indian kitkanne, meaning "greatest river."

Kittatinny; range of hills in eastern Pennsylvania and Virginia. A Delaware Indian word meaning "endless hills."

Kittitas; county in Washington, named from an Indian settlement on the banks of the Yakima River. The word means "shoal" in the Yakima language.

Kittrell; town in Vance County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident.

Kittson; county in Minnesota, named for Norman W. Kitson, a leading pioneer of the State.

Klamath; river in California, lake and county in Oregon;

Klamath Falls; town in Klamath County, Oregon; named for the Indian tribe.

Klej Grange; town in Worcester County, Maryland; the name is a combination of the first letters of the names of the daughters of J. W. Drexel, of New York, Kate, Louise, Emma, and Josephine.

Klickitat; county in Washington, named from a tribe of Indians, the name signifying "beyond."

Kline; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for a resident.

Kneeland; prairie in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Knife; river in North Dakota, the original French name being couteau, meaning "knife."

Knightstown; town in Henry County, Indiana, named for Jonathan Knight, United States engineer.

Knightsville; town in Clay County, Indiana, named for A. W. Knight, its founder.

Knott; county in Kentucky, named for Proctor Knott.

Knowersville; town in Albany County, New York, named for the Knower family.

Knox; counties in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, county, and town in Waldo County, in Maine, and counties in Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Tennessee, and Texas.

Knoxville; village in Crawford County, Georgia; town in Albany County, New York, and city in Knox County, Tennessee; named for Gen. Henry Knox.

Knoxville; town in Franklin County, Mississippi, named by the first settlers from the city in Tennessee.

Knoxville; village in Madison County, New York, named for Herman Knox, an early resident.

Knoxville; village in Steuben County, New York, and borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Chief Justice John Knox, of the Supreme Court.

Konkapot; creek, rising in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Capt. John Konkapot, chief of the Stockbridge Indians, about 1720.

Kooskia; town in Idaho County, Idaho, named from the Clearwater River, whose Nez Perce Indian name, kooskooskee, means "small water" or "small stream."

Korbel; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Kortright; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Lawrence Kortright, a patentee.

Kosciusko; county in Indiana and town in Attala County, Mississippi, named for Tadeusz Kosciusko, a Polish patriot.

Koshkonong; village in Oregon County, Missouri, and lake, creek, and town in Rock County, Wisconsin. An Indian word of doubtful meaning, possibly referring to koshkosh, a hog.

Kossuth; county in Iowa, plantation in Washington County, Maine, town in Alcorn County, Mississippi, and village in Auglaize County, Ohio, named for Louis Kossuth, the Hungarian patriot.

Kotzebue; sound of Alaska, named for its discoverer, the Russian navigator, Otto von Kotzebue.

Kreischerville; village in Richmond County, New York, named for B. Kreischer.

Krenitzin; five islands in the Aleutian Archipelago, named for the navigator who first discovered them.

Kubbakwana; lake at the sources of the Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "rest in the path."

Kutztown; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, named for George Kutz, who laid out the town.

Kwichluak; an arm of the Yukon River in Alaska. An Indian word meaning "crooked river."

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

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