US Place Names ~ New Haven, Vermont to Nye County, Nevada

New Haven; town in Addison County, Vermont, named from the city in Connecticut.

New Iberia; town in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, given the ancient name of Spain.

Newicargut; river in Alaska. An Indian word meaning "frog river."

New Jersey; State of the Union; originally a grant to Sir George Carteret, who named it for his home on the Isle of Jersey, off the coast of England.

New Kent; county in Virginia, and island in Chesapeake Bay, named from the county in England.

New Hartford; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, settled by people from Hartford.

New Lexington; village in Perry County, Ohio, named from the town in Massachusetts.

New London; county, and city in same county, in Connecticut, and town in Stanly County, North Carolina, named from London in England.

New London; city in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, named from New London, Connecticut, by an early settler.

New Madrid; county, and city in same county, in Missouri. The land was originally a grant to Gen. George Morgan from Spain, and was named by him from its principal city.

Newmarket; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named from the city in England.

New Marlboro; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from the city in Middlesex County.

New Mexico; Territory of the Union, named from the country of Mexico.

Newman; city in Coweta County, Georgia;

Newmanville; village in Alachua County, Florida. Named for Gen. Daniel Newman, an officer in the Seminole war.

New Orleans; city in Orleans parish, Louisiana, named from the city in France.

New Philadelphia; city in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, named by its founder, John Knisely, from the city in Pennsylvania.

Newport; towns in Herkimer County, New York, and Carteret County, North Carolina, and county in Rhode Island, named from the city in Rhode Island.

Newport; borough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, so named at the time of the opening of the Pennsylvania canal, as being a new port for shipping.

Newport, city in Newport County, Rhode Island, so named by a party of settlers from Portsmouth, who called it a "new port."

Newport News; city in Warwick County, Virginia, named for Capt. Christopher Newport and Captain (or Sir William) Newce.

New Richmond; village in Clermont County, Ohio, named from the city in Virginia.

New Richmond; city in St. Croix County, Wisconsin, named for Richmond Day, a founder.

New Rochelle; city in Westchester County, New York, named from the city in France.

Newry; towns in Troup County, Georgia, and Oxford County, Maine, township in Freeborn County, Minnesota, borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, and town in Vernon County, Wisconsin, named either directly or indirectly from the town in Ireland.

New Smyrna; town in Orange County, Florida, named from the native place of the wife of Dr. Andrew Turnbull, a colonist.

Newton; county in Arkansas, named for Isaac Newton, who spoke in opposition to secession at the meeting in Little Rock, in 1861.

Newton; county, and town in Baker County, in Georgia, city in Jasper County, Illinois, and counties in Indiana, Missouri, and Texas, named for Sergt. John Newton, of the Revolutionary war.

Newton; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named from the city in Massachusetts.

Newton; city in Middlesex Count v, Massachusetts, originally a part of Cambridge, and when separated called "new town," afterwards contracted to Newton.

Newton; county in Mississippi, named for Sir Isaac Newton.

New Ulm; city in Brown County, Minnesota, named by immigrants from their native city of Ulm, Germany.

New York; State of the Union, and county in same State, named for the Duke of York, the original grantee.

Nez Perce; county, and town in same county, in Idaho, and river in Yellowstone Park, named for a tribe of Indians, who were so called by the French settlers, the phrase meaning "pierced nose."

Niagara; county in New York and river between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. An Iroquois Indian word meaning "across the neck," or "at the neck,"

Niagara Falls; city in Niagara County, New York, named from the celebrated falls on the Niagara River.

Niantic; river, village, and bay in New London County in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "at the point of land on a tidal river."

Nicholas; county in Kentucky, named for Col. George Nicholas, a Revolutionary officer.

Nicholas; county in West Virginia, named for an early governor, W. C. Nicholas. Nicholas; village in Wasco County, Oregon, named for an early settler.

Nicholasville; city in Jessamine County, Kentucky, named for Col. George Nicholas, a Revolutionary officer.

Nicholville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for E. S. Nichols, an agent of the proprietor.

Nickerson; city in Nickerson County, Kansas, named for Thomas Nickerson, an officer of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. Nicollet; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, named for Joseph Nicholas Nicollet, a French explorer, and cartographer.

Nicomanchee; very dark stream in Washington. An Indian word meaning "shadowy water."

Nigger Baby Hill; mining camp in Dolores County, Colorado, so named because of the large amount of black oxide of manganese found in the outcrop.

Nilaks; mountain in Oregon. Derived from the Indian word, nilakshi meaning "daybreak."

Ninety-six; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, so named because it was 96 miles from the Cherokee Indian trading town of Keowee.

Ninevah; township in Johnson County, Indiana, and six other places, bear the name of the ancient capital of Assyria.

Niobrara; river, and village in Knox County, in Nebraska. An Indian word meaning "broad water," or "running water."

Nippenose; creek and valley in Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning "like summer," or "where cold does not penetrate."

Nishnabotna; river in Iowa, and village in Atchison County, Missouri. An Indian word meaning "canoe-making river."

Niskayuna; town in Schenectady County, New York. An Indian word meaning "extensive corn flats."

Nitre; town in Contra Costa County, California, named from the nitroglycerin works within its limits.

Niwot; village in Boulder County, Colorado. The Indian name for Left Hand Creek.

Noank; village in New London County, Connecticut. Derived from the Indian word, nayong, "point of land."

Noble; county in Indiana, named for Noah Noble, an early governor.

Noble; county in Ohio, named for James Noble, an early settler.

Noble; county in Oklahoma, named for John Noble, at one time Secretary of the Interior.

Nobles; county in Minnesota, named for Col. William H. Nobles, a member of the Minnesota Territorial legislature.

Noblesboro; town in Lincoln County, Maine, named for James Noble, an early settler.

Noblesville; city in Noble County, Indiana, named for Noah Noble, an early governor.

Nockamixon; township and village in Bucks County, Pennsylvania; a Delaware Indian word meaning "where there are three houses."

Nodoway; county and river in Missouri. An Algonquian Indian word signifying "snakes," and, figuratively, "aliens" or "enemies."

Nogales; town in Santa Cruz County, New Mexico. Derived from the Spanish word, nogal, meaning "common walnut tree."

Nokomis; city in Montgomery County, Illinois, named for the mother of Wenonah in Longfellow's "Hiawatha," the Ojibwa Indian word meaning "grandmother."

Nolan; county in Texas, named for Philip Nolan, a trader and Indian fighter in the early days of Texas.

Nordhoff; town in Ventura County, California, named for Charles Nordhoff.

Norfolk; county in Massachusetts, city in Madison County, Nebraska, and county, and town in same county, in Virginia, named from the county in England.

Normal; town in McLean County, Illinois, so named because it is the seat of the State Normal School.

Norman; county in Minnesota, named for Norman W. Kittson, a prominent pioneer.

Normans Kill; stream in New York, named for Albert Andriessen Bradt de Norman, an early settler.

Norridgewock; town in Somerset County, Maine. An Indian word meaning ''place of deer," or, according to another authority, ''smooth water between falls."

Norris; town within the corporate limits of Detroit, settled by and named for Col. P. W. Norris.

Norris; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for Philetus W. Morris, the second superintendent of the reserve.

Norristown; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for Isaac Norris, who purchased the land from William Penn.

North; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for John F. North, its founder.

North Adams; city in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from its relation to Adams, of which it was originally a part.

Northampton; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and counties in Pennsylvania and Virginia, named from the county in England.

Northampton; county in North Carolina, named for the Earl of Northampton.

Northampton; township in Summit County, Ohio, named by Simon Prior, an early settler from Northampton, Massachusetts.

North Anna; river in Virginia, named for Anne, Queen of England.

North Bend; city in Dodge County, Nebraska, so called because it is situated in the north bend of the Platte River.

North Bend; village in Hamilton County, Ohio, named from the bend in the Ohio River at that point.

North Canaan; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, named from its relation to Canaan, of which it originally formed a part.

North Carolina; State of the Union, named for King Charles II of England.

North Dansville; town in Livingston County, New York, named for Daniel P. Faulkner, an early settler.

Northeast; town in Dutchess County, New York, so named because of its geographical position in the county.

Northfield; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, so called because of its northerly situation in the county.

Northfield; city in Rice County, Minnesota, named for John W. North, who laid out the town.

Northfield; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for its location in the county.

Northford; village in New Haven County, Connecticut. The name is formed from North Branford and Wallingford, of which towns the village was originally a part North Hero; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for one of the two islands which were called "Two Heroes" and granted to Ethan Allen, the intention being that they should be owned only by brave men warmly disposed toward the Revolution.

North Manchester; town in Wabash County, Indiana, named from the city in England, with the prefix ''north," to distinguish it from another Manchester in the State.

Northport; characteristic name given to several places in the United States.

Northumberland; towns in Coos County, New Hampshire, and Saratoga County, New York, county, and borough in same county in Pennsylvania, and county in Virginia, named from the county in England.

North Vernon; township and town in Jennings County, Indiana, named from the town of Vernon in France.

Northville; township and village in Wayne County, Michigan, named for its location in the northerly part of the oldest county in the State.

North Webster; village in Kosciusko County, Indiana, named for Daniel Webster.

Norton; comity, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Capt. Orloff Norton, of the Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry.

Norton; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England.

Norton; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for Birdsey Norton, a principal land proprietor.

Norton Sound; an inlet of Bering Sea on the coast of Alaska, named for Sir Fletcher Norton.

Nortonville; city in Jefferson County, Kansas, named for L. Norton, jr., of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company.

Norwalk; city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, said to have been so named because, when purchased from the Indians, the northern boundary was to extend north-ward from the sea one day's walk, according to the Indian marking of the distance. According to another authority it is derived from nayang, ''point of land."

Norwalk; town in Warren County, Iowa, and city in Huron County, Ohio, named from Norwalk, Connecticut.

Norway; township and city in Dickinson County, Michigan, so named by the early Norwegian settlers.

Norway; towns in Herkimer County, New York, and Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named from the country in Europe.

Norwich; city in New London County, Connecticut, and village in Chenango County, New York, named from the city in England.

Norwich; village in Kingman County, Kansas, and town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named from Norwich, Connecticut.

Norwood; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, and twenty-two other places, being generally named from the town in England.

Nottoway; river and county in Virginia, named for the Indian tribe, the word meaning "snake" that is, an enemy.

Novato; village and township in Marin County, California. A Spanish word meaning "new," "commencing in anything."

Novo-Arkhangelsk; seaport of Alaska, named from the city in Russia.

Noxubee; county in Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "stinking water."

Nuckolls; county in Nebraska, named for an early settler.

Nueces; river and county in Texas. Derived from the Spanish word nuez, meaning "nut," pecan.

Nuevo; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning "new" or "modern."

Nunda; village in McHenry County, Illinois, and town in Livingston County, New York, derived from the Indian word nundao, meaning "hilly," or, according to another authority, "potato ground."

Nyack; village in Rockland County, New York, originally written Niack. An Indian word meaning "comer" or "point."

Nye; county in Nevada, named for James W. Nye, the first governor of the Territory.

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

Please Come Again!!





This page was last updated Thursday, 13-Aug-2015 17:44:06 EDT

 Copyright 2011-2017 AHGP - Judy White
The American History and Genealogy Project.
Enjoy the work of our webmasters, provide a link, do not copy their work.