US Place Names ~ San Joaquin, California to Seminole, Florida

San Joaquin; county and river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning "whom Jehovah has appointed."

San Jose; city in Santa Clara County, California, named for the patron saint of Mexico.

San Jose; village in Mason County, Illinois, named from the city in California.

San Juan; counties in Colorado and New Mexico, and river in Utah. The name is the Spanish form of Saint John.

San Juan; county in Utah, named for the San Juan River, which traverses it.

San Juan; county in Washington, named for the Greek navigator, Juan de Fuca.

San Lucas; town in Monterey County, California. The Spanish form of Saint Luke.

San Luis Obispo; county, and city in same county, in California, named for an old Spanish mission. The name means Saint Louis, bishop.

San Luis Rey; town in San Diego County, California, named for Louis IX, of France, meaning Saint Louis, king.

San Marcos; town in San Diego County, California, named from the old Spanish grant Los Vallecitos de San Marcos, "the little valleys of Saint Mark."

San Mateo; county, and city in same county, in California. The Spanish form for Saint Matthew.

San Miguel; town in San Luis Obispo County, California, and counties in Colorado and New Mexico. The Spanish form of Saint Michael.

San Patricio; county in Texas, settled by Irish colonists, and named by them for the patron saint of Ireland, of which the present name is the Spanish form.

San Pedro; city in Los Angeles County, California, named for the Spanish saint.

Sanpete; county in Utah, named for an Indian chief.

San Quentin; town in Marin County, California, said to be named for a former resident.

San Rafael; township and city in Marin County, California, named for the Spanish saint.

San Saba; county and river in Texas, probably named for the old San Saba mission established in 1734 in what is now Menard County. The Spanish form of "Holy Savior."

Sans Tache; town in Fresno County, California. A French phrase meaning "spot-less."

Santa Ana; township, and city in Orange County, California, named for an old Spanish mission.

Santa Barbara; county, and city in same county, in California, named for an old Spanish mission.

Santa Clara; county, and town in same county, in California, named for an old Spanish mission.

Santa Cruz; county in Arizona, and county, city in same county, and island of California. A Spanish phrase meaning "holy cross."

Santa Fe; city in Haskall County, Kansas, town in Monroe County, Missouri, and county, and city in same county, in New Mexico. A Spanish phrase meaning "holy faith."

Santa Monica; township, and city in Los Angeles County, in California, named for the Spanish saint, the mother of Saint Augustine.

Santa Rosa; county in Florida, named for a saint of the Roman Catholic Church.

Santa Ynez; town in Santa Barbara County, California, named for an old Spanish mission. The Spanish form of St. Agnes.

Sapinero; town in Gunnison County, Colorado, named for a sub-chief of the Ute Indians.

Saranac; river and lake in New York;

Saranac Lake; village in Franklin County, New York. An Indian word meaning "river that flows under a rock."

Saratogra; town in Santa Clara County, California, named from the town in New York.

Saratogra; county, town in same county, and lake in New York;

Saratogra Springs; town and village in Saratoga County, New York. An Indian word said to mean "place of the miraculous water in a rock."

Sarcoxie; city in Jasper County, Missouri, named for a friendly Indian chief.

Sardinia; town in Erie County, New York, named from the island in the Mediterranean Sea.

Sardis; town in Panola County, Mississippi, named from the ruined city in Asia Minor.

Sargent; county in North Dakota, named for a former general manager of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

Sarpy; county in Nebraska, named for Peter A. Sarpy.

Sassafras; stream in Maryland. The English form of the Indian word winakhanne.

Satartia; town in Yazoo County, Mississippi. Derived from an Indian word meaning "pumpkin place."

Saucon; township and creek in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning "outlet of a smaller stream."

Saugatuck; river and village in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and village in Allegan

County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning "outlet of the tidal river."

Saugerties; town in Ulster County, New York. One authority states that it is an Indian word meaning "at the outlet;" another gives it as from the Dutch, zaeger's kill, meaning "sawyer's creek," so given because a saw-mill was erected on the town site.

Saugus; town in Essex County, Massachusetts. The Indian name of Lynn, the word meaning "extended."

Sauk; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin;

Sauk Center; city in Stearns County, Minnesota;

Sauk Rapids; village in Benton County, Minnesota. Named from the Sauk or Sac Indian tribe, the word meaning "people living at a river mouth."

Sault Sainte Marie; city in Chippewa County, Michigan, situated at the foot of the rapids of St. Marys River. A French phrase meaning "falls of St. Mary."

Saunders; tributary of the Yellowstone River, Montana, named for a trapper who lived in the region.

Saunders; county in Nebraska, named for Governor Alvin Saunders.

Sauratown; town in Stokes County, North Carolina, named from the Sara Indian tribe.

Sausalito; town in Marin County, California. A Spanish word meaning "little willow."

Sauvie; island in the Columbia River, Oregon, named for Jean Baptiste Sauve, a French Canadian, who kept a dairy there.

Savanna; city in Carroll County, Illinois;

Savannah; city in Chatham County and river in Georgia, and town in Wayne County, New York. The name is a Creek corruption of the name of the Shawnee Indians, who formerly lived upon the Savannah River.

Savoy; village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for Princess Cothilda of Savoy, who visited Illinois in 1861.

Savoy; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from the town in Switzerland.

Sawadabscook; branch of the Penobscot River in Maine. An Indian word meaning " place of large, smooth rocks."

Sawyer; county in Wisconsin, named for Philetus Sawyer, Senator from that State.

Saxapahaw; town in Alamance County, North Carolina. A corruption of the name of an Indian tribe, Sissipahaw, Saybrook; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, named for Lords Say and Brook.

Saybrook; village in McLean County, Illinois, named from Saybrook, Connecticut.

Sayre; borough in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, probably named for R. S. Sayre, chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad.

Scales Mound; township and village in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, named from the proximity of a large mound owned by Samuel Scales.

Scammon; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for four brothers, early settlers from Illinois.

Scandia; city in Republic County, Kansas, named for the Scandinavian agricultural society by which it was colonized.

Scandinavia; village in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, named for the people by whom it was settled.

Scantic; river, and village in Hartford County, Connecticut. Derived from the Indian word reskatuk, meaning "branch of the river."

Scarboro; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named from the town in England.

Scarsdale; town in Westchester County, New York, named from the town in Derbyshire, England.

Scatacook; river in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "confluence of two streams."

Schaghticoke; town in Rensselaer County, New York, situated at the confluence of the Hoosic and Hudson rivers. Derived from an Indian word pachgatgoch, "place where a river branches."

Schellsburg; borough in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, named for the man who laid it out. Schenectady; county, and city in same county, in New York. Derived from the Indian meaning "over beyond the plains," or "river valley beyond the pinetrees."

Schererville; village in Lake County, Indiana, named for Scherer Wright, its founder.

Schleicher; county in Texas, named for Gustav Schleicher, member of Congress from that State.

Schleisingerville; village in Washington County, Wisconsin, named for B. Schleisinger Weil, its founder.

Schley; county in Georgia, named for William Schley, a former governor.

Schodack; town in Rensselaer County, New York. An Indian word meaning "meadow or fire plain,'' so called because it was in ancient times the seat of the council fires of the Mohegans.

Schoharie; county, town in same county, and creek in New York. An Indian word meaning "flood wood," or "driftwood." Another authority gives "tributary that throws its waters across the main stream."

Schonbrunn; town in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. A German word meaning "beautiful fountain."

Schoodic; river, and chain of lakes, in Maine. An Indian word to which many meanings are credited, among them, "trout place," "burnt lands," "place where water rushes," and "where fish live all the year."

Schoolcraft; county, and village in Kalamazoo County, in Michigan, named for Henry R. Schoolcraft, distinguished for his Indian researches.

Schroeppel; town in Oswego County, New York, named for Henry W. Schroeppel, an early resident.

Schroon; lake, river, mountain, and town in Essex County, in New York. Opinions differ as to the derivation of this name, some saying that it is derived from the Indian shaghnetaghrowahora, meaning "largest lake," or from the Saranac Indian, "daughter of the mountains;" another authority stating that it was named for the Duchess Scharon, of the court of Louis XIV.

Schulenburg; town in Fayette County, Texas, named for a man prominent in the organization of a corporation that built the town.

Schuyler; counties in Illinois, Missouri, and New York, named for Gen. Philip Schuyler, early mayor of Albany, New York.

Schuyler; city in Colfax County, Nebraska, named for Schuyler Colfax, Vice-President under President Grant.

Schuylerville; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for Gen. Philip Schuyler, a prominent man, and early mayor of Albany.

Schuylkill; county and river in Pennsylvania; so named because the first explorers passed its mouth without seeing it, which caused them to give it this Dutch name, meaning "hidden stream." The Delaware Indians called the river ganshowe-hanne, "waving stream."

Schuylkill Haven; town in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, so named because of its location at the head of the Schuylkill Canal.

Scio; town in Allegany County, New York, named from the island in the Mediterranean.

Sciota; village in McDonough County, Illinois, and river and county in Ohio. Derived from the Indian word seeyotah, meaning "great legs," and applied to the river on account of its numerous and long branches.

Scipio; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the Roman general.

Scitico; village in Hartford County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "at the branch."

Scituate; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the stream running into the harbor, which derived its name from the Indian word saiuit, "cold brook."

Scooba; town in Kemper County, Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "reed brake."

Scotland; counties in Missouri and North Carolina, and city in Bonhomme County, South Dakota named for the division of Great Britain.

Scott; County in Arkansas, named for Judge Andrew Scott.

Scott; county in Illinois, name from Scott County, Kentucky.

Scott; counties in Indiana and Kentucky, named for Gen. Charles Scott, governor of Kentucky, 1808-1812.

Scott; county in Iowa, county, and city in same county, in Kansas, and counties in Minnesota, Tennessee, and Virginia, named for Gen. Winfield Scott.

Scott; county in Missouri, named for John Scott.

Scottdale; borough in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, named for Thomas A. Scott, of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Scotts Bluff; county in Nebraska, named for the bluff where a man named Scott met death by starvation.

Scottsboro; town in Baldwin County, Georgia, named for Gen. John Scott.

Scottsburg; village in Livingston County, New York, named for Matthew and William Scott, early settlers.

Scotts Greek; township in Jackson County, North Carolina, named for John Scott, a trader among the Cherokees.

Scottsville; town in Allen County, Kentucky, named for Gen. Charles Scott, an early governor of the State.

Scottsville; village in Monroe County, New York, named for Isaac Scott, the first settler.

Scranton; town in Jackson County, Mississippi, named from the city in Pennsylvania.

Scranton; city in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, named for Joseph H. Scranton, its founder.

Scratch Gravel; hills in Lewis and Clark County, Montana, 5 miles northwest of Helena, so named because gold was picked up in the gravel after a heavy rain.

Screven; county in Georgia, named for Gen. James Screven, a Revolutionary officer.

Scriba; town in Oswego County, New York, named for George Scriba, the resident proprietor.

Scurry; county in Texas, named for William B. Scurry, brigadier-general in the Army of the Confederacy.

Seaboard; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named from the Seaboard Air Line.

Seabright; borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named from the town in England.

Sea Cliff; village in Nassau County, New York, where camp meetings were formerly held upon a cliff by the salt water, from which circumstance the village was named.

Sea Isle City; borough in Cape May County, New Jersey, so named because it is situated near the seashore.

Searcy; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Richard Searcy.

Searles; post-office in Kern County, California, named for J. W. Searles, who discovered borax in the Mohave Desert in 1863.

Searsmont; town in Waldo County, Maine;

Searsport; town in Waldo County, Maine. Named for David Sears, of Boston, Massachusetts.

Seattle; city in King County, Washington, named for the chief of the Duwamish tribe of Indians, See-aa-thl.

Sebago; lake in York County, and lake, pond, and town in Cumberland County, Maine. An Indian word meaning "stretch of water," or "place of river lake."

Sebamook; lake in Maine. An Indian word given two different meanings, "large bay lake" and "bright water."

Sebastian; county in Arkansas, named for Senator William K. Sebastian. Sebethe; river in Connecticut. Supposed to be derived from the Indian word sepoese, "small river."

Sebewa; village in Ionia County, Michigan. Derived from the Indian word sibiwe, "rivulet," or "brook."

Sebewaing; village in Huron County, Michigan. Derived from the Indian word sibiweng, "at the creek."

Seboeis; lake, stream, and plantation in Penobscot County, in Maine. Supposed to be derived from an Indian word meaning "little river."

Secaucus; town in Hudson County, New York. Thought to be derived from the Indian word sekakes, used in reference to snakes.

Seco; creek in Texas, and village in Boxelder County, Utah. A Spanish word meaning "dry."

Secor; village in Woodford County, Illinois, named for a railroad builder.

Sedalia; city in Pettis County, Missouri. A modification of the original name Sadieville, having been named for the daughter of Gen. G. R. Smith, who laid out the town.

Sedan; city in Chautauqua County, Kansas, named from the town in France.

Sedgwick; county, and fort in same county, in Colorado, mountain in Idaho, and county, and city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for Gen. John Sedgwick.

Sedgwick; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Maj. Robert Sedgwick.

Seekonk; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts. Said to be derived from an Indian word meaning "black goose," or "wild goose."

Seguin; town in Gaudalupe County, Texas, named for Col. Juan Seguin, a Mexican who joined fortunes with the Texans in 1836.

Seiglingville; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for Gen. Randolph Seigling, a prominent capitalist of Charleston.

Selinsgrove; borough in Snyder County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early settlers.

Sellersville; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The Anglicized form of the original name. Zoellers, a family of early residents for whom it was named.

Sellwood; town in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for Governor Sellwood.

Selma; city in Dallas County, Alabama, named from the "Songs of Selma," in Ossian.

Selma; town in Fresno County, California, named from the city in Alabama.

Seminole; town in Hillsboro County, Florida, and nation in Indian Territory, named for the Indian tribe; the word probably means "separatist," or "renegade."

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

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