US Place Names ~ Waas Mountain, Utah to Washta, Iowa

Waas; mountain in Utah, named for a Ute Indian chief.

Wabash; county in Illinois, county, and city in same county, in Indiana, and river traversing both States. From the Indian word, wuabache, meaning "cloud borne by an equinoctial wind,'' or, according to another authority, "white water."

Wabasha; county, and town in same county, in Minnesota, named for the Dakota (Sioux) chief Wapashaw, meaning "red leaf," "red cap," or "red flag," from a gift of a military uniform and flag of England to the first of three hereditary chiefs who bore the name.

Wabaunsee; county, and town in same county, in Kansas, named for a Pottawatomi Indian chief, the name signifying "dim daylight," or "cancer of paleness," given because he captured an enemy's camp just at the break of day.

Wabeno; town in Forest County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "men of the dawn," or ''eastern men."

Wacasassee; river, and bay in Florida, so named because of the herds of cattle frequenting it A Seminole word meaning "cow range."

Waccamaw; town in Georgetown County, South Carolina, and river, lake, and township in Brunswick County, North Carolina, named for an Indian tribe.

Wachusett; mountain in Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning ''near the little mountain."

Waco; town in Smith County, Mississippi, village in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and city in McLennan County, Texas, named for an Indian tribe.

Waconia; village in Carver County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "living spring."

Waconda; village in Mitchell County, Kansas. An Indian word meaning "spirit."

Wacouta; village in Goodhue County, Minnesota. A Sioux Indian word meaning "shooter," the name of an Indian chief who lived at Red Wing.

Waddams; township in Stephenson County, Illinois, named for William Waddams, one of the first settlers in the county.

Waddington; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler.

Waddington; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Joshua Waddington, proprietor.

Wadena; county, and town in same county, in Minnesota, an archaic Ojibway word meaning "little round hill."

Wadesboro; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Col. Thomas Wade.

Wading River; village in Suffolk County, New York, named from the river, which was so called because the Indians waded into it for the shellfish.

Wadsworth; township and village in Medina County, Ohio, named for Col. E. Wadsworth.

Wady Petra; village in Stark County, Illinois. From the Arabian, wady, meaning "valley," and the Latin, petra, "rock."

Waga; tributary to the Minnesota River. An Indian word meaning "cotton wood."

Wagara; stream in New Jersey. Derived from the Indian word woakeu, "crooked," or "bent," and aki, "a place."

Wagoner; town in Aiken County, South Carolina, named for F. W. Wagener, capitalist, of Charleston.

Wahkiakum; county in Washington, named for a tribe of Indians, said to have received their name from their first chief.

Wahoo; village in Lumpkin County, Georgia, and precinct in Saunders County, Nebraska. An Indian word said to mean a species of elm.

Wahpeton; city in Richland County, North Dakota. A Sioux Indian word meaning "leaf village."

Waitsfield; town in Washington County, Vermont, named for Gen. Benjamin Waite, the first settler.

Wakatomika; village in Coshockton County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning "other side town."

Wake; county in North Carolina, named for the wife of Governor Tryon.

Wakeeney; city in Trego County, Kansas, named for its founders, A. E. Warren and J. F. Keeney.

Wakefield; city in Clay County, Kansas, named for the Rev. Richard Wake, one of its founders.

Wakefield; town in Middlesex County, Massathusets, named for Cyrus Wakefield.

Wakefield; village in Wake County, North Carolina.

Wake Forest; town in Wake County, North Carolina. Named for the wife of Governor Tryon.

Wakenda; town in Carroll County, Missouri. An Indian word meaning "worshiped."

Wakulla; county in Florida, named for the famous spring near the Gulf coast. An Indian word meaning "mystery."

Walden; town m Orange County, New York, named for Jacob T. Walden, a prominent citizen.

Walden; town in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for commanding officer of the military forces present during the building of a road in the vicinity.

Waldo; county in Maine.

Waldoboro; town in Lincoln County, Maine. Named for Brig. Gen. Samuel Waldo, of Boston.

Waldron; island in Washington, named for W. T. Waldron, of the ship Porpoise.

Wales; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for James Lawrence Wales.

Walesboro; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for John P. Wales, its founder.

Walhalla; towns in Pembina County, North Dakota, and Oconee County, South Carolina. A Scandinavian name meaning "palace of immortality."

Walhonding; river in Ohio. An Indian word meaning "white woman."

Walke; point in North Landing River, Virginia, named for the oldest resident family of Princess Anne County.

Walker; county in Alabama, named for Senator J. W. Walker, of the State.

Walker; pass in California, and lake and river in Esmeralda County, Nevada, named for Joseph Reddeford Walker, guide of Fremont's second expedition.

Walker; county in Georgia, named for Freeman Walker.

Walker; village in Macon County, Illinois, named for J. W. Walker, one of the founders.

Walker; county in Texas, named for Robert J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury during President Polk's Administration.

Walkerville; city in Silverbow County, Montana, named for the owner of the "Alice" mine.

Wallace; county, and town in same county, in Kansas, named for Gen. William H. L. Wallace, a veteran of the Mexican war.

Wallace; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident.

Wallace; county in North Dakota, named for "Farmer" Wallace, a pioneer of the State in 1870.

Wallawalla; county, and city in same county, in Washington. From a Nez Perce Indian word used to designate a rapid stream.

Wallenpaupack; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning ''deep, dead water."

Waller; county in Texas, named for Edwin Waller, formerly postmaster-general under the republic.

Wallface; mountain on the west side of the Indian Pass, in the Adirondack Mountains, so called because it terminates at this place in a precipice hundreds of feet high.

Wall Hill; town in Marshall County, Mississippi, named for William Wall.

Wallington; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for Walling Van Winkle, the former owner.

Walloostook; river in Maine. An Indian word meaning "stream where you get boughs," or "fine, beautiful river."

Wallowa; county and river in Oregon. An Indian word meaning a tripod for holding a fish trap in the water.

Walnut; township and village in Bureau County, Illinois, so named from the large number of walnut trees within the limits.

Walpack; township in Sussex County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning "sudden bend of a stream around the base of a rock."

Walpole; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Sir Robert Walpole.

Walpole; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named from the town in England.

Walsenburg; town in Huerfano County, Colorado, named for Fred Walsen, a banker and old settler.

Walsh; County in North Dakota, named for George H. Walsh.

Walterboro; town in Colleton County, South Carolina, named for the Walter family, prominent residents of the State.

Walthall; town in Webster County, Mississippi, named for Gen. Edward Walthall.

Waltham; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, supposedly named from Waltham Abbey, England.

Waltham; town in Addison County, Vermont, named from the city in Massachusetts.

Walton; county in Florida, named for Colonel Walton, of Georgia.

Walton; county in Georgia, named for George Walton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Walton; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for a stockholder of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad.

Walton; town in Delaware County, New York, named for William Walton, a large land proprietor.

Walworth; town in Wayne County, New York, and county in Wisconsin, named for Chancellor Reuben H. Walworth.

Walworth; county in South Dakota, named from the county in Wisconsin.

Wamego; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, said to be so named because formerly there was no water in the village. An Indian word meaning "clear of springs." Other authorities say that it was named for an Indian chief whose name meant "running waters."

Wamesit; village in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From the Indian word wame, "all," or "whole," and auke, "place."

Wampum; borough in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. The name of the Indian shell money.

Wanaque; river and valley in New Jersey. An Indian word meaning "sassafras place."

Wanatah; town in Laporte County, Indiana, named from an Indian chief, whose name signified "he that charges on his enemies."

Wangunbog; pond in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "bent pond."

Wapakoneta, village in Auglaize County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning "clay river."

Wapanucka; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Derived from Wappanocca, the name given the Delawares by other Indians, it signifying "East-landers."

Wapato; village in Washington County, Oregon. The Indian designation of a bulbous root resembling a potato.

Wapella; village in Dewitt County, Illinois, named for a chief of the Fox tribe, the name meaning "he who is painted white."

Wapiti; village in Summit County, Colorado. An Indian word meaning "elk."

Wappinger; creek and town in Dutchess County, New York;

Wappingers Falls; village in Dutchess County, New York. Named for an Indian tribe.

Wapsipincon; river in Iowa, so named because of the root which is found in great abundance upon its banks. An Indian word meaning "white potatoes."

Wapwallopen; stream and village in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian name said by some to mean "place where the messengers were murdered;" by others, "where white hemp grows."

Waquapaug; stream in Rhode Island. An Indian word meaning "at the end of the pond."

Ward; town in Boulder County, Colorado, named for the Ward lode, discovered in 1860.

Ward; village in Boone County, Indiana, named for Thomas Ward, Congressman from that State.

Ward; peak in Montana, named for Artemus Ward.

Ward; point on Staten Island, New York, named for the man who formerly owned that part of the island.

Ward; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Mark Ward, of South Dakota.

Ward; county in Texas, named for Thomas W. Ward, the commissioner of the gen-eral land office under the first State governor of Texas.

Wards; island in New York, named for Jasper and Bartholomew Ward, former proprietors.

Wards; town in Saluda County, South Carolina, named for the Ward family, prominent residents of the State.

Wardsboro; town in Windham County, Vermont, named for William Ward, of Newfane, the principal proprietor.

Ware; county in Georgia named for Nicholas Ware, an early Senator from Georgia.

Ware; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, so named on account of the weirs, or weirers, formerly constructed in the river to catch salmon.

Wareham; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England.

Waresboro; town in Ware County, Georgia, named for Nicholas Ware, an early Senator from that State.

Warm Springs; town in Alameda County California, named from the hot springs.

Warner; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Jonathan Warner, of Portsmouth.

Warnerville; village in Schoharie County, New York, named for Capt. George Warner, the first settler.

Warramaug; pond in Litchfield County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "good fishing place."

Warren; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler.

Warren; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, named for Samuel Warren of Revolutionary fame.

Warren; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, and Kentucky; town in Knox County, Maine; fortification in Boston Harbor, and town in Worcester County, Massachusetts; counties in Mississippi, Missouri, and New Jersey; county and town in Herkimer County, New York; counties in North Carolina and Ohio; county, and borough in same county, in Pennsylvania; and counties in Tennessee and Virginia; named for Joseph Warren, who fell in the battle of Bunker Hill.

Warren; township and village in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, named for the first white child born in the settlement.

Warren; county in Indiana, named for Gen. Francis Warren.

Warren; city in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for Gen. Moses Warren, of Lyme, Connecticut.

Warren; towns in Grafton County, New Hampshire, and Bristol County, Rhode Island, named for Admiral Sir Peter Warren, of the royal navy.

Warrensburg; town in Macon County, Illinois, named for a family prominent in the county.

Warrensville; township in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for Moses Warren, an early settler.

Warrenton; towns in Warren County, North Carolina, and Fauquier County, Virginia, named for Gen. Joseph Warren, who fell in the battle of Bunker Hill.

Warrick; county in Indiana, named for Capt. Jacob Warrick, killed in the battle of Tippecanoe.

Warsaw; township and town in Hancock County, Illinois, city in Kosciusko County, Indiana, and town in Benton County, Missouri, named from the capital city of Poland.

Warwick; towns in Franklin County, Massachusetts; Orange County, New York, and Kent County, Rhode Island, and county in Virginia, named for the Earl of Warwick.

Washburn; village in Woodford County, Illinois, named for the Washburne family.

Washburn; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for Israel Washburn, jr., governor of the State during the civil war.

Washburn; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for Gen. Henry Dane Washburn.

Washburn; county, and town in Bayfield County, in Wisconsin, named for Cadwallader C. Washburn, former governor.

Wasco; county in Oregon, named for an Indian tribe, the name signifying "grass."

Washabaugh; county in South Dakota, named for Frank Washabaugh, a prominent State politician.

Washington; State of the Union; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; counties in Maine and Maryland; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; counties in Missis-sippi and Missouri; highest peak of the White Mountains in New Hampshire; counties in New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin; and probably the counties in Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, and Utah; and many cities, towns, and villages. Named for Gen. George Washington.

Washington; city in the District of Columbia, the capital of the United States, named for George Washington, first President of the United States.

Washining; Washinee; lakes in the town of Salisbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, connected by a small stream. The names are of Indian origin, expressing beauty, washining indicating a higher degree of charm than washinee,

Washita; village in Montgomery County, Arkansas, and county in Oklahoma. Another form of "Wichita."

Washoe; county, and city in same county, in Nevada, named for a tribe of Indians in that vicinity.

Washta; town in Cherokee County, Iowa. A Sioux Indian word meaning "good."

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

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