US Place Names ~ Washtenaw County, Michigan to West Point, New York

Washtenaw; county in Michigan, named from the east branch of Grand River; the name is said to be derived from the Indian word washtenong, "river that is far off."

Wasioja; town in Dodge County, Minnesota, so named because of the pine trees growing near. An Indian word meaning "pine grove."

Wassaic; village in Dutchess County, New York. An Indian word meaning "difficult," or "hard work."

Wastedo; town in Goodhue County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "good."

Watab; village in Benton County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "root of pine," or "to sew a canoe."

Wataga; village in Knox County, Illinois. From the Pottawatomi Indian word meaning, "I heard;" or, if derived from ahweataga, "he has gone to ramble."

Watch Sill; town in Washington County, Rhode Island. From this promontory the Narragansett Indians watched for their enemies, the Montauks.

Wateree; river, and town in Richland County, in South Carolina, named for an Indian tribe.

Waterford; town in Marshall County, Mississippi, so named on account of the great volume of water contained in Spring Creek at this point.

Waterford; village in Saratoga County, New York, and town in Caledonia County, Vermont, named from the city in Ireland.

Waterford; town in Loudoun County, Virginia, named by an early settler from Waterford in Ireland, his native place.

Waterloo; city in Monroe County, Illinois, village in Douglas County, Nebraska, and many other places; named from the battlefield in Belgium.

Watertown; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, so called because it was a ''well-watered place," and the first means of communication between this place and Boston was by water.

Watertown; town in Jefferson County, New York, so named on account of the extraordinary amount of water power.

Water Valley; city in Yalobusha County, Mississippi, so named on account of the continuous flow of water in the valley.

Waterville; town in Marshall County, Kansas, named from Waterville, New York, the home of Colonel Osborne, who was the contractor for the construction of the railroad.

Waterville; city in Kennebec County, Maine, so named because of its situation at Ticonic Falls on the Kennebec River, which furnishes the motive power for the factories of the city.

Watervliet; city on the Hudson, in Albany County, New York. From the Dutch, meaning "flowing stream."

Wathena; city in Doniphan County, Kansas, named for a chief of the Kickapoo Indians.

Watkins; village in Schuyler County, New York, named for Dr. Samuel Watkins, of London, one of the first proprietors.

Watkinsville; town in Oconee County, Georgia, named for Col. Robert Watkins, of Augusta, member of the State legislature.

Watonwan; county and river in Minnesota. A Dakota (Sioux) name, meaning "fish bait," or "where fish bait abounds."

Watrous; town in Mora County, New Mexico, named for Samuel B. Watrous, an early settler.

Watseka; city in Iroquois County, Illinois, named for a mythical Indian girl who saved her tribe from disaster. Another authority gives it as a corruption of an Indian word, meaning "pretty woman."

Watson; township and village in Effingham County, Illinois, named for George Watson, a constructing railroad engineer.

Watson; town in Lewis County, New York, named for James Watson, a former proprietor.

Watson; town in Hampshire County, West Virginia, named for Joseph Watson, the former owner of the land.

Watsontown; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for John Watson, the original proprietor.

Watsonville; city in Santa Cruz County, California, named for Col. James Watson, a first settler.

Wattsburg; borough in Erie County, Pennsylvania, named for David Watts, an early settler.

Waubay; village in Day County, South Dakota. An Indian word meaning "place of hatching."

Waubeek; towns in Linn County, Iowa, and Dunn County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "metal," or "metallic substance."

Waubesa; lake in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning ''swan."

Wauconda; village in Lake County, Illinois. A Sioux Indian word signifying "sacred," or "god."

Waukarusa; stream in Kansas. An Indian word meaning "hip deep."

Waukau; a town in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "habitually," or "often."

Waukegan; township and city in Lake County, Illinois, first called Little Fort. In 1849 the name was changed to the present form, said to be the Indian translation of the old name.

Waukesha; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin. From the Indian wauk-tsha, meaning "fox."

Waukon; town in Allamakee County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning "moss on trees that is eatable."

Waunakee; village in Dane County, Wisconsin. From the Indian word wanaki, "he lies," or "he lives in peace."

Wauneta; village in Chase County, Nebraska. An Indian word meaning "winter camp."

Waupaca; county in Wisconsin, named for the Menominee Indians, the meaning being "pale water."

Wauponsee; town in Grundy County, Illinois. For derivation see Wabaunsee.

Waupun; town in Fond du lac County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "early," or "early day," or, according to another authority, from uaba, meaning "east!"

Wauregan; village in Windham County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "good thing."

Wausau; city in Marathon County, Wisconsin. A corruption of wassa, meaning "faraway."

Wausaukee; river in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "distant land."

Wauseon; village in Fulton County, Ohio, named for an Indian chief. The word means "far off."

Wauwatosa; city in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. A corruption of wewatessi, meaning "fire-fly."

Wauzeka; village in Crawford County, Wisconsin, named for an Indian chief; the name is said to mean "pine."

Waverly; city in Morgan County, Illinois, and villages in Tioga County, New York, and Pike County, Ohio, named from Scott's novels.

Waxahachie; town in Ellis County, Texas, so named because of the large number of cattle in the vicinity. An Indian word meaning "cow town," or "cow creek."

Waxhaw; creek in North Carolina and South Carolina, towns in Union County, North Carolina, and Lancaster County, South Carolina, named for an Indian tribe.

Waycross; town in Ware County, Georgia, named from the crossing of two ways or roads.

Wayland; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Francis Wayland.

Wayland; village in Steuben County, New York, named for Rev. Francis Wayland, of Rhode Island.

Waymansville; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Charles L. Wayman, its founder.

Wayne; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and West Virginia, and probably the counties in Nebraska and Utah; Waynesboro; towns in Burke County, Georgia, and Wayne County, Mississippi, and borough in Franklin County, Pennsylvania; Waynesburg; town in Stark County, Ohio, and borough in Greene County, Pennsylvania;

Waynesfield; town in Auglaize County, Ohio;

Waynesville; township and village in Dewitt County, Illinois, and towns in Haywood County, North Carolina, and Warren County, Ohio. Named for Gen. Anthony Wayne, hero of the Revolution.

Wayzata; village in Hennepin County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "at the mouth."

Weakley; county in Tennessee, named for Robert Weakley, a member of the House of Representatives and the reviser of the constitution of Tennessee.

Weare; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Meshech Weare, chief justice of the province of New Hampshire.

Weatherford; city in Parker County, Texas, said to be named for Jefferson Weatherford, one of its early settlers.

Weatogue; village in Hartford County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "wigwam place."

Weauatucket; river in Connecticut. From the Indian, "land at the end of tide water."

Weaverville; town in Trinity County, California, named for a pioneer.

Weaverville; town in Buncombe County, North Carolina, named for a family numerous in the State.

Webb; county in Texas, named for Judge James Webb, politician in the early days of the State.

Webb City; city in Jasper County, Missouri, so named because lead and zinc were first discovered in that locality on the farm of John C. Webb.

Webberville; village in Ingham County, Michigan, named for Herbert Webber, an early settler.

Weber; county and river in Utah, named for a well-known trapper and guide.

Webster; counties in Georgia, Iowa, and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts; counties in Mississippi and Missouri; town in Merrimac County, and mountain in New Hampshire; county in West Virginia; and many cities, towns, and villages; probably, also, the county in Nebraska;

Webster Groves; city in St. Louis County, Missouri. Named for Daniel Webster, the statesman.

Wecuppemee; river in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "linden" or "basswood."

Wedge; mountain in Montana, so named on account of its shape.

Weedsport; village in Cayuga County, New York, named for Elisha and Edward Weed, the first settlers.

Weehawken; town in Hudson County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning "maize land."

Weeping Child; stream in Ravalli County, Montana, so named, according to tradition, from the circumstance of an Indian child being carried off by a mountain lion, causing insanity in the mother.

Weeping Water; river in Nebraska. A translation of the Indian word nehaga.

Weir; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for T. M. Weir, its founder.

Weisner; mountain in Idaho, named for a topographer with the Mullan expedition.

Weissport; borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, named for Col. Jacob Weiss, an officer of the Revolution, who early settled in the Lehigh Valley.

Weitchpec; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an Indian town called Weitspus; the word is said to mean "junction of rivers."

Welaka; town in Putnam County, Florida. An Indian word meaning "river of lakes."

Welch; town in McDowell County, West Virginia, named for Capt. J. A. Welch, of that county.

Weld; county in Colorado, named for Lewis Ledyard Weld, first secretary of Colorado Territory.

Weld; town in Franklin County, Maine, named for Benjamin Weld, one of the original owners.

Weldon; village in Dewitt County, Illinois, named for Judge Lawrence M. Weldon.

Weldon; town in Halifax County, North Carolina, named for a resident family.

Wellfleet; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. The name is doubtless a corruption of "whale fleet."

Wellington; city in Sumner County, Kansas, and township and village in Lorain County, Ohio, named for the Duke of Wellington.

Wells; county in Indiana, named for Capt. William Wells, killed at the Fort Dearborn massacre.

Wells; town in York County, Maine, supposed to be named from the town in England.

Wells; town in Hamilton County, New York, named for Joshua Wells, the first settler.

Wells; county in North Dakota, named for the Hon. E. P. Wells, of Jamestown, an old settler.

Wellsboro; borough in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, named for Mrs. Henry Wells Morris, an early resident.

Wellsburg; town in Chemung County, New York, named for a family who formerly owned most of the town site.

Wellsburg; city in Brooke County, West Virginia, named for Alexander Wells.

Wells River; stream which rises in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for Captain Wells, who was drowned in it.

Wells River; village in Orange County, Vermont, named from the river.

Wellston; township and city in Jackson County, Ohio, named for Harvey Wells, its founder.

Wellsville; town in Allegany County, New York, named for Gardiner Wells, a prominent resident.

Wellsville; city in Franklin County, Kansas, named for D. L. Wells, a railroad contractor.

Wellsville; town in Montgomery County, Missouri, named for Judge Carly Wells.

Wellsville; city in Columbiana County, Ohio, named for William Wells, who laid it out.

Wendell; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Oliver Wendell, a Boston banker.

Wenham; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from the town in Suffolk County, England.

Wenona; city in Marshall County, Illinois.

Wenonah; borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey. Derived from the Sioux Indian, meaning "first-born daughter."

Wentworth; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named for Benning Wentworth, former governor of the State.

Wentzville; town in St. Charles County, Missouri, named for the man who laid it out.

Wepatuck; mountain in Connecticut, an Indian word meaning "place at the narrow pass or strait."

Wesaw; river in Miami County, Indiana, named for an Indian chief.

Wesley; township in Washington County, Ohio, and town in Washington County, Maine, named for John Wesley, the founder of Methodism.

Wesson; town in Copiah County, Michigan, named for Col. J. M. Wesson, its founder.

West; town in McLean County, Illinois, named for Henry West.

West Baton Rouge; parish in Louisiana. See Baton Rouge,

West Bend; city in Washington County, Wisconsin, so named because of the bend in Milwaukee River at this point.

Westboro; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, formerly a part of Marlboro, hence its name.

Westby; village in Vernon County, Wisconsin, named for O. T. Westby, an early settler.

West Carroll; parish in Louisiana, named for Charles Carroll of Carrollton.

Westchester; county in New York, named from the town in England.

West Creek; town in Ocean County, New Jersey. Derived from an Indian word meaning "place to get meat."

Westerlo; town in Albany County, New York, named for Rev. Eilardus Westerlo, of Albany.

Westerly; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, so named because of its location in the most westerly part of the State.

West Feliciana; parish in Louisiana. See East Feliciana.

Westfield; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, so named because situated on the west boundary of an early survey.

Westhampton; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, so named because, until its incorporation, it was the west parish of Northampton.

West Haverstraw; town in Rockland County, New York, named from haverstraw, a Dutch word, originally written haverstroo, and meaning "oat straw." Believed to have been suggested by wild oats growing there.

West Jersey; township and village in Stark County, Illinois, named by the first settlers from the State of New Jersey.

Westminster; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from the borough of London.

Westmoreland; town in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named from the county in Pennsylvania.

Westmoreland; counties in Pennsylvania and Virginia, named from the county in England.

Weston; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and city in Platte County, Missouri, so named because situated at the western edge of their respective counties.

Weston; county in Wyoming, named for a man prominent in the building of railroads in eastern and northern Wyoming.

Westphalia; village in Clinton County, Michigan, named from the province in Germany.

West Plains; city in Howell County, Missouri, so named because the settlement was in a prairie in a westerly direction from the nearest town.

West Point; city in Troup County, Georgia, probably named from its location at the most westerly point of the Chattahooche River.

West Point; town in Clay County, Mississippi, so named because of its location in the extreme westerly part of the county.

West Point; United States military academy in Orange County, New York. The promontory known as Gees Point was called West Point by the early settlers on the opposite bank of the river, as in their descriptions they designated it as ''the point to the West."

US Place Names

Source: The Origin of Certain Place Names the United States, Second Edition, Henry Gannett, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1906.

 

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